Etymology
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sitar (n.)
1845, from Hindi sitar, from Persian sitar "three-stringed," from si "three" (Old Persian thri-; see three) + tar "string," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."
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on-site (adj.)
also onsite, 1959, from on + site. Originally in reference to Cold War military inspections.
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site (v.)
"to give a location to, place," 1590s, from site (n.). Related: Sited; siting.
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sitophobia (n.)
"morbid aversion to food" (or certain foods), 1882, from Greek sitos "wheat, corn, meal; food," of unknown origin, + -phobia. Related: Sitophobe; sitophobic.
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situation (n.)
Origin and meaning of situation

early 15c., situacioun, "place, position, or location," from Old French situacion or directly from Medieval Latin situationem (nominative situatio) "a position, situation," noun of action from past-participle stem of situare "to place, locate," from Latin situs "a place, position" (from PIE root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home"). Meaning "state of affairs" is from 1710; meaning "employment post" is from 1803.

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sitcom (n.)

by 1959, from the first elements of situation comedy, a phrase attested from 1953 of television shows, 1943 of radio programs; see situation.

Even Bing Crosby has succumbed to series TV and will appear in a sitcom as an electrical engineer who happens to break into song once a week. [Life magazine, Sept. 18, 1964]
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situate (v.)
early 15c., "to place in a particular state or condition," from Medieval Latin situatus, past participle of situare "to place, locate," from Latin situs "a place, position" (from PIE root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home"). Related: Situated; situating.
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situs (n.)
Latin, "situation, position" (see site). In technical uses in English, "proper or original position and location of something" (as in in situ).
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sith (adv., conj., prep.)
"since" (obsolete), Middle English, reduced from Old English siððan "then, thereupon; continuously, during which; seeing that," from *sið þon "subsequent to that," from sið "after," from Proto-Germanic *sith- "later, after" (source also of Old Saxon sith "after that, since, later," German seit "since," Gothic seiþus "late"), from PIE *se- (2) "long, late" (see soiree).
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site (n.)
"place or position occupied by something," especially with reference to environment, late 14c., from Anglo-French site, Old French site "place, site; position," and directly from Latin situs "a place, position, situation, location, station; idleness, sloth, inactivity; forgetfulness; the effects of neglect," from past participle of sinere "let, leave alone, permit," from PIE *si-tu-, from root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home."
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