Etymology
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respire (v.)

late 14c., respiren, "breathe, draw breath," from Old French respirer (12c.) and directly from Latin respirare "breathe again, breathe in and out," from re- "again" (see re-) + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). Formerly also "to rest or enjoy relief after toil or exertion" (1590s). Related: Respired; respiring.

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jut (v.1)

"to protrude, extend forward beyond the main body," mid-15c., corruption of obsolete verb jet, from Old French jeter "to throw," from Latin iacēre "to lie, rest," related to iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Jutted; jutting. As a noun, "a jutting out, a projecting point" from 1786.

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incubation (n.)
1610s, "a brooding," from Latin incubationem (nominative incubatio) "a laying upon eggs," noun of action from past participle stem of incubare "to hatch," literally "to lie on, rest on," from in- "on" (from PIE root *en "in") + cubare "to lie" (see cubicle). The literal sense of "sitting on eggs to hatch them" in English is first recorded 1640s.
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jetty (n.)

early 15c., from Old French jetee, getee "a jetty, a pier; a projecting part of a building," also "a throw," noun use of fem. past participle of jeter "to throw," from Latin iacēre "to lie, rest," related to iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). The notion is of a structure "thrown out" past what surrounds it.

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coy (adj.)

early 14c., "quiet, modest, demure," from Old French coi, earlier quei "quiet, still, placid, gentle," ultimately from Latin quietus "free; calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). Meaning "shy, bashful" emerged late 14c. Meaning "unwilling to commit" is by 1961. Related: Coyly; coyness.

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buck-tooth (n.)
also bucktooth, "tooth that juts out beyond the rest," 1540s, from buck (n.1), perhaps on the notion of "kicking up," + tooth. In French, buck teeth are called dents à l'anglaise, literally "English teeth." Old English had twisel toð "with two protruding front teeth." Related: Buck-toothed.
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mortification (n.)

late 14c., mortificacioun, "mortifying of the flesh, act of subduing the passions and appetites, suppression of bodily desires," from Late Latin mortificationem (nominative mortificatio) "a killing, putting to death," from past-participle stem of mortificare (see mortify). Meaning "death of one part of the body while the rest is still alive" is from early 15c. Sense of "feeling of humiliation" is recorded by 1640s.

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Provence 

region and former province of southeast France, from French Provence, from Latin provincia "province" (see province); the southern part of ancient Gaul technically was the province of Gallia Narbonensis, but it came under Roman rule long before the rest of Gaul and as the Romans considered it the province par excellence they familiarly called it (nostra) provincia "our province."

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Cottonian 

c. 1700, "pertaining to or founded by antiquarian Sir Robert Bruce Cotton (1570-1631), especially in reference to the library in the British Museum, named for him. He donated some books to the state and his grandson donated the rest. It was badly damaged in a fire in 1731. The surname represents Old English cotum, plural of cot "cottage."

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lie (v.2)

"rest horizontally, be in a recumbent position," Middle English lien, from Old English licgan (class V strong verb; past tense læg, past participle legen) "be situated, have a specific position; remain; be at rest, lie down," from Proto-Germanic *legjan (source also of Old Norse liggja, Old Saxon liggian, Old Frisian lidzia, Middle Dutch ligghen, Dutch liggen, Old High German ligen, German liegen, Gothic ligan "to lie"), from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay."

Especially "to lie in bed," hence often with sexual implications, as in lie with "have sexual intercourse" (c. 1300), and compare Old English licgan mid "cohabit with." To lie in "be brought to childbed" is from mid-15c. To lie to at sea is to come to a standstill. To take (something) lying down "receive passively, receive with abject submission" is from 1854.

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