Etymology
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steeplechase (n.)
1793 (earlier steeplehunt, 1772), from steeple + chase (n.). Originally an open-country horse race with a visible church steeple as a goal.
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jotun (n.)
"one of the race of giants in Scandinavian mythology," 1804, a word revived by scholars from Old Norse jotunn "a giant," from the common Germanic word (see ettin).
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breed (n.)
"race, lineage, stock from the same parentage" (originally of animals), 1550s, from breed (v.). Of persons, from 1590s. Meaning "kind, species" is from 1580s.
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racing (n.)

"the running of races, the occupation or business of arranging for or carrying on races," originally especially horse races, 1670s, verbal noun from race (v.).

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rodent (n.)

"a rodent mammal" 1835 (as an adjective 1833), from Modern Latin Rodentia, the order name, from Latin rodentem (nominative rodens), "the gnawers," present participle of rodere "to gnaw, eat away," which is of uncertain etymology, possibly is from an extended form of PIE root *red- "to scrape, scratch, gnaw." Uncertain connection to Old English rætt (see rat (n.)). They are characterized by having no canine teeth and strong incisors.

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escalation (n.)
1938, derived noun from escalate; the figurative sense is earliest, originally in reference to the battleship arms race among global military powers.
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millstream (n.)

"a mill-race, a current of water that drives a mill-wheel," Old English mylestream; see mill (n.1) + stream (n.).

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anybody (n.)
c. 1300, ani-bodi, "any person," from any + body. One-word form attested by 1826. Phrase anybody's game (or race, etc.) is from 1840.
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ratio (n.)

1630s, "reason, rationale," from Latin ratio "reckoning, numbering, calculation; business affair, procedure," also "reason, reasoning, judgment, understanding," from rat-, past participle stem of reri "to reckon, calculate," also "think" (from PIE root *re- "to reason, count"). Mathematical sense "relation between two similar magnitudes in respect to quantity," measured by the number of times one contains the other is attested from 1650s.

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Pamphylia 
ancient region in modern Turkey, from Greek, literally "place of all races," from pan "all" (see pan-) + phylon "race" (see phylo-).
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