Etymology
Advertisement
Monterey 
city in California, U.S., formerly the Spanish Pacific capital, named for the bay, which was named 1603 for Spanish colonist and viceroy of New Spain Conde de Monterrey. The Monterrey in Mexico also is named for him.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
methadone (n.)

synthetic analgesic used as a substitute for morphine or heroin in treatment of addiction, 1947, generic designation for 6-dimethylamino-4, 4-diphenyl-3-heptanone. For origins of the syllables, see methyl + amino- + di- + -one.

Related entries & more 
froggy (n.)
1822 as a familiar name for a frog, from frog (n.1) + -y (3). As a disparaging term for a Frenchman by 1857.
Related entries & more 
rhino (n.)

short for rhinoceros, 1884. As slang for "cash" (also rino) 1680s, but the signification is now unknown. Hence cant rhinocerial "rich."

Related entries & more 
desire (v.)
Origin and meaning of desire

"to wish or long for, express a wish to obtain," c. 1200, desiren, from Old French desirrer (12c.) "wish, desire, long for," from Latin desiderare "long for, wish for; demand, expect," the original sense perhaps being "await what the stars will bring," from the phrase de sidere "from the stars," from sidus (genitive sideris) "heavenly body, star, constellation" (but see consider). Related: Desired; desiring.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
good (n.)
Old English god (with a long "o"), "that which is good, a good thing; goodness; advantage, benefit; gift; virtue; property;" from good (adj.). Meaning "the good side" (of something) is from 1660s. Phrase for good "finally, permanently" attested from 1711, a shortening of for good and all (16c.). Middle English had for good ne ylle (early 15c.) "for good nor ill," thus "under any circumstance."
Related entries & more 
Bartlett 

U.S. name for a variety of pear, 1835, named for Enoch Bartlett, who first distributed them in the U.S. The quotation collection is named for U.S. bookstore owner John Bartlett of Cambridge, Massachusetts, who first printed his "A Collection of Familiar Quotations" in 1855.

Related entries & more 
camelopard (n.)
an old name for "giraffe," late 14c., from Late Latin camelopardus, shortened from Latin camelopardalis, from Greek kamelopardalis "a giraffe," a compound of kamelos "camel" (see camel), for the long neck, and pardos "leopard, panther" (see pard (n.1)), for the spots.
Related entries & more 
commercial (adj.)

1680s, "engaging in trade," from commerce + -al (1). Meaning "done for the sake of financial profit" (of art, etc.), "prepared for the market or as an article of trade" is from 1871. Meaning "paid for by advertisements" (in reference to radio, TV, etc.) is from 1932. Related: Commercially.

Related entries & more 
poor-box (n.)

"box for receiving contributions of money for the poor," generally at the entrance of a church, 1620s, from poor (n.) + box (n.1).

Related entries & more 

Page 8