Etymology
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delusory (adj.)

late 15c., "false, deceitful," from Latin delusor "a deceiver," from stem of deludere "to play false, mock, deceive" (see delude).

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scene-shifter (n.)

"one who arranges the movable scenes in a theater as the play requires," 1752, from scene (n.) "stage-setting" + agent noun from shift (v.).

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putt (n.)

1660s, originally figurative, "a putting, pushing, shoving, thrusting," special Scottish use and pronunciation of put (n.). Golfing sense of "to play with a putter" is from 1743.

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hob (n.)
"clown, prankster," short for hobgoblin (q.v.). Hence, to play (the) hob "make mischief" (by 1834).
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ludic (adj.)
"spontaneously playful," 1940, a term in psychiatry, from French ludique, from Latin ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).
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rig (n.2)

"a wanton girl or woman," 1570s, slang, now obsolete, of obscure origin. Also as a verb, "to play the wanton, romp about." Related: Rigged; rigging.

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fielding (n.)
"play in the field," 1823 in cricket (by 1884 in baseball), verbal noun from field (v.).
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pageant (n.)

late 14c., pagent, "a play in a cycle of mystery plays," from Medieval Latin pagina, a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from Latin pagina "page of a book" (see page (n.1)) on notion of "manuscript" of a play.

But an early sense in Middle English also was "wheeled stage or scene of a play" (late 14c.) and Klein, Century Dictionary, etc., say a sense of Medieval Latin pagina was "movable scaffold" (probably from the etymological sense of "stake"). The sense might have been extended from the platform to the play presented on it.

With unetymological -t as in ancient (adj.). In Middle English also "a scene in a royal welcome or a Roman triumph" (mid-15c.); "a story, a tale" (early 15c.); "an ornamental hanging for a room" (mid-15c.). The generalized sense of "showy parade, spectacle" is attested by 1805, though this notion is found in pageantry (1650s).

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gamble (v.)
"risk something of value on a game of chance," 1726 (implied in gambling), from a dialectal survival of Middle English gammlen, variant of gamenen "to play, jest, be merry," from Old English gamenian "to play, joke, pun," from gamen (see game (n.)), with form as in fumble, etc. Or possibly gamble is from a derivative of gamel "to play games" (1590s), itself likely a frequentative from game. Originally regarded as a slang word. The unetymological -b- may be from confusion with unrelated gambol (v.). Transitive meaning "to squander in gambling" is from 1808. Related: Gambled; gambling.
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game (v.)
Middle English gamen "to sport, joke, jest," from Old English gamenian "to play, jest, joke;" see game (n.). The Middle English word is little recorded from c. 1400 and modern use for "to play at games" (1520s) probably is a new formation from the noun; and it might have been re-re-coined late 20c. in reference to computer games. Related: Gamed; gaming.
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