Etymology
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updraft (n.)
also updraught, "rising air current," 1909, from up (adj.) + draft (n.).
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airport (n.1)

also air port, "facility for commercial air transport," used regularly from 1919 (used once, by Alberto Santos-Dumont, in reference to airships, in 1902), from air (n.1) meaning "aircraft" + port (n.1). First reference is to Bader Field, outside Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S., which opened in 1910. An older word for such a thing was aerodrome.

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aerobic (adj.)
"able to live or living only in the presence of oxygen, requiring or using free oxygen from the air," 1875, after French aérobie (n.), coined 1863 by Louis Pasteur in reference to certain bacteria; from Greek aero- "air" (see aero-) + bios "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live." Aerobian and aerobious also were used in English. Hence aerobe "type of micro-organism which lives on oxygen from the air." Meaning "pertaining to aerobics is from 1968.
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airline (n.)
also air-line, 1813, "beeline, straight line between two points on the earth's surface" (as through the air, rather than over terrain), from air (n.1) + line (n.). From 1853 and in later 19c. especially in reference to railways that ran directly between big cities in the U.S. instead of meandering from town to town in search of stock subscriptions as early railways typically did. Meaning "public aircraft transportation company" is from 1914.
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aerodonetics (n.)

science of gliding, 1907, Modern Latin coinage by English engineer Frederick W. Lanchester (1868-1946) from Greek aēr (genitive aeros) "air" (see air (n.1)) + stem of donein "to shake, drive about." Also see -ics.

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guff (n.)
"empty talk, nonsense," 1888, from earlier sense of "puff of air" (1825), of imitative origin.
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anaerobic (adj.)

"capable of living without oxygen," 1884 (earlier anaerobian, 1879), from French anaérobie, coined 1863 by French bacteriologist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), from Greek an- "without" (see an- (1)) + aēr "air" (see air (n.1)) + bios "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

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humidifier (n.)

"device for making air more humid," 1884, agent noun from humidify.

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carbon dioxide (n.)
1869, so called because it consists of one carbon and two oxygen atoms. The chemical was known since mid-18c. under the name fixed air; later as carbonic acid gas (1791). "The term dioxide for an oxide containing two atoms of oxygen came into use in the middle of the 19th century." [Flood].
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backflip (n.)

"a backwards somersault in the air," 1906; see back (adj.) + flip (n.).

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