Etymology
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diocesan (adj.)

"pertaining to a diocese," mid-15c., from Old French diocésain (15c.) and directly from Medieval Latin diocesanus, from diocese (see diocese). As a noun, "a diocesan bishop," from mid-15c.

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siesta (n.)

"interval of sleep or repose taken at mid-day," 1650s, from Spanish siesta "mid-day rest or nap," from Latin sexta (hora) "sixth (hour)," the mid-day hour (coming six hours after sunrise), from sexta, fem. of sextus "sixth" (see Sextus). A common practice in hot countries.

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accordingly (adv.)

mid-14c., "in agreement with" (now obsolete), from according + -ly (2). From mid-15c. as "properly, adequately;" meaning "agreeably with logic or expectation" is from 1680s.

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felonious (adj.)

mid-15c., "wicked, criminal" (implied in feloniously), from felony + -ous. Replaced felonous (mid-14c.) by c. 1600. Felonly (c. 1300) was another variation.

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