Etymology
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resoluble (adj.)

early 15c. in medicine (Chauliac), "capable of being dissolved," from Medieval Latin resolubilis, from re- "back" (see re-) + solubilis "that may be loosened or dissolved" (see soluble). From c. 1600 as "capable of being resolved."

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emetic 

1650s (n.) "medicine that induces vomiting;" 1660s (adj.) "inducing vomiting;" from French émétique (16c.), from Latin emeticus, from Greek emetikos "causing vomiting," from emesis "vomiting," from emein "to vomit," from PIE *weme- "to spit, vomit" (see vomit (v.)).

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silphium (n.)
plant genus, 1771, from Latin, from Greek Silphion, name of a North African Mediterranean plant whose identity has been lost, the gum or juice of which was prized by the ancients as a condiment and a medicine. Probably of African origin.
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expectorant (n.)

in medicine, "a drug which promotes or facilitates phlegm or other such matter from the body by means of expectoration," 1782, from Latin expectorantem (nominative expectorans), present participle of expectorare (see expectorate). From 1811 as an adjective.

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speculum (n.)
1590s, in surgery and medicine, "instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation," from Latin speculum "reflector, looking-glass, mirror" (also "a copy, an imitation"), from specere "to look at, view" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). As a type of telescope attachment from 1704.
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tonic (n.1)
"a tonic medicine," 1799, from tonic (adj.). From 1873 (in gin and tonic) as short for tonic water (1861 as a commercial product, water infused with quinine), so called because held to aid digestion and stimulate appetite.
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savable (adj.)

also saveable, early 15c. in medicine (Chauliac), "able to be healed;" mid-15c., in theology, "capable of being saved" (from sin or spiritual death); late 15c., in a general sense, "saving, protecting;" see save (v.) + -able

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reiteration (n.)

early 15c., reiteracion, "repetition, a repeated action," originally in medicine, from Medieval Latin reiterationem (nominative reiteratio) "repetition, a repeating," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reiterare "to repeat" (see reiterate). Of statements, words, by 1650s.

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empirical (adj.)

1560s, originally in medicine, "pertaining to or derived from experience or experiments," from Latin empiricus (n.) "a physician guided by experience," from Greek empeirikos "experienced," from empeiria "experience; mere experience or practice without knowledge," especially in medicine, from empeiros "experienced (in a thing), proven by use," from assimilated form of en "in" (see en- (2)) + peira "trial, experiment," from PIE *per-ya-, suffixed form of root *per- (3) "to try, risk." With -al (1). In a general sense of "guided by mere experience" from 1757. Related: Empirically (1640s as "by means of observation and experiment").

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salubrious (adj.)

"favorable to health, wholesome," 1540s, from Latin salubris "promoting health, healthful," from salus (genitive salutis) "welfare, health" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). Originally of foods, medicine; in reference to air, climate, etc., by 1610s. Related: Salubriously; salubriousness.

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