Etymology
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pediatrics (n.)

"medical treatment of children; the branch of medicine dealing with the study of childhood and diseases of children," 1884; from pediatric; see -ics.

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aplasia (n.)
"defective or arrested development of a body part," 1876, medical Latin, from Greek a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + -plasia. Related: Aplastic.
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benefits (n.)
"financial support (especially for medical expenses) to which one is entitled through employment or membership," 1895, plural of benefit (n.).
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cervix (n.)
early 15c., "ligament in the neck," from Latin cervix "the neck, nape of the neck," from PIE *kerw-o-, from root *ker- (1) "horn; head." Applied to various neck-like structures of the body, especially that of the uterus (by 1702), where it is shortened from medical Latin cervix uteri (17c.). Sometimes in medical writing 18c.-19c. cervix of the uterus to distinguish it from the neck sense.
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hemophobia (n.)
1844, from hemo- "blood" + -phobia "fear." Perhaps based on French hémophobie. Originally in reference to fear of medical blood-letting.
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hyperinflation (n.)
1925 in the economic sense, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + inflation. Earlier as a medical term in treatment of lung diseases.
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shunt (n.)
1838, in railway use, from shunt (v.). By technicians in the sense of "electrical conductor" from 1863. Medical use dates from 1923.
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sclerotic (adj.)
early 15c., "pertaining to sclerosis," from medical Latin scleroticus, from Greek skleroun (see sclerosis). Figurative meaning "unchanging, rigid" is from 1961.
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ureter (n.)
1570s, from medical Latin ureter, from Greek oureter "urinary duct of the kidneys," from ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine). Related: Ureteral.
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variola (n.)
"smallpox," 1771, medical Latin diminutive of Latin varius "changing, various," in this case "speckled, spotted" (see vary).
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