Etymology
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multiphase (adj.)

also multi-phase, "having or producing two or more phases," 1890, from multi- "many" + phase (n.).

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few (adj.)

Old English feawe (plural; contracted to fea) "not many, a small number; seldom, even a little," from Proto-Germanic *fawaz (source also of Old Saxon fa, Old Frisian fe, Old High German fao, Old Norse far, Danish faa), from PIE root *pau- (1) "few, little."

Always plural in Old English, according to OED "on the analogy of the adverbial fela," meaning "many." Phrase few and far between attested from 1660s. Unusual ironic use in quite a few "many" (1854), earlier a good few (1803).

There is likewise another dialectical use of the word few among them [i.e. "the Northern Counties"], seemingly tending to its total overthrow; for they are bold enough to say—"a good few," meaning a good many. [Samuel Pegge, "Anecdotes of the English Language," London, 1803]
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switchboard (n.)
also switch-board, "device for making interchangeable connections between many circuits," 1867, from switch (n.) + board (n.1).
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pluri- 
word-forming element meaning "more than one, several, many," from Latin pluri-, from stem of plus (genitive pluris); see plus.
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Samos 

Greek island in the Aegean, from Old Greek samos "a height, dune, seaside hill." Many references to it are as the birthplace of Pythagoras.

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polyclinic (n.)

"place for treatment of, or instruction in the treatment of, various diseases," 1890, from poly- "many" + clinic. The spelling distinguishes it from policlinic.

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polyhedral (adj.)

"having many faces" (as a solid body); "of or pertaining to a polyhedron," 1741, from polyhedron + -al (1). Related: Polyhedric; polyhedrical; polyhedrous.

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multimedia (adj.)

also multi-media, "using more than one medium" (in the arts, education, or communication), by 1959, from multi- "many" + media.

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encyclopaedia (n.)
see encyclopedia. The Latin spelling survives as a variant because many of the most prominent ones (such as Britannica) have Latin names.
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trompe l'oeil 
1889, French, literally "deceives the eye," from tromper "to deceive," a verb of uncertain origin and the subject of many theories (see trump (v.2)).
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