Etymology
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poesy (n.)

late 14c., poesie, "poetry; poetic language and ideas; literature; a poem, a passage of poetry," from Old French poesie (mid-14c.), from Vulgar Latin *poesia (source of Provençal, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian poesia), from Latin poesis "poetry, a poem," from Greek poēsis "composition, poetry," literally "a making, fabrication," variant of poiēsis, from poein, poiein "to make or compose" (see poet). Meaning "the art of poetic composition, skill in making poems" is from late 15c.

A poem, as I have told you, is the work of the poet; the end and fruit of his labour and study. Poesy is his skill or craft of making; the very fiction itself, the reason or form of the work. [Ben Jonson, "Discoveries"]
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workhouse (n.)
Old English weorchus "workshop;" see work (n.) + house (n.). From 1650s in the sense of "place where the able-bodied poor or petty criminals are lodged and compelled to work."
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cooperation (n.)

"the act of working together to one end," 1620s, from French coopération, or directly from Late Latin cooperationem (nominative cooperatio) "a working together," noun of action from past-participle stem of cooperari "to work together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + operari "to work," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance."

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Milicent 
fem. proper name, earlier Malasintha, from shortened form of Old High German Amalswind, literally "strong in work," from amal "work" + *swind "strong" (related to Old English swið "strong," gesund "healthy").
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karma (n.)
1827, in Buddhism, the sum of a person's actions in one life, which determines his form in the next; from Sanskrit karma "action, work, deed; fate," related to Sanskrit krnoti, Avestan kerenaoiti "makes," Old Persian kunautiy "he makes;" from PIE root *kwer- "to make, form" (see terato-). "Latterly adopted by Western popular 'meditative' groups" [OED, 1989]. It is related to the second element in Sanskrit.
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inwork (v.)
1680s, from in (adv.) + work (v.).
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loiter (v.)
early 15c., "idle one's time, dawdle over work;" perhaps from or akin to Middle Dutch loteren "be loose or erratic, shake, totter" like a loose tooth or a sail in a storm; in modern Dutch, leuteren "to delay, linger, loiter over one's work," according to Watkins, literally "to make smaller," and perhaps from Germanic *lut-, from PIE *leud- "small" (see little (adj.)).

The Dutch word is said to be cognate with Old English lutian "lurk," and related to Old English loddere "beggar;" Old High German lotar "empty, vain," luzen "lurk;" German Lotterbube "vagabond, rascal," lauschen "eavesdrop;" Gothic luton "mislead;" Old English lyðre "base, bad, wicked." Related: Loitered; loitering.
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