Etymology
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reliquiae (n.)

"remains (as those of fossil organisms)," 1650s, Latin plural of reliquus "remainder, residue," noun use of an adjective meaning "that is left, remaining, left over," a derivative of relinquere (perfective reliqui) "to leave behind, forsake, abandon, give up," from re- "back" (see re-) + linquere "to leave" (from PIE *linkw-, nasalized form of root *leikw- "to leave"). As "literary remains," by 1933.

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persona (n.)
1917, "outward or social personality," a Jungian psychology term, from Latin persona "person" (see person). Used earlier (1909) by Ezra Pound in the sense "literary character representing voice of the author." Persona grata is Late Latin, literally "an acceptable person," originally applied to diplomatic representatives acceptable to the governments to which they were sent; hence also persona non grata (plural personæ non gratæ).
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elocution (n.)

mid-15c., elocucioun, "oratorical or literary style," from Late Latin elocutionem (nominative elocutio) "voice production, a speaking out, utterance, manner of expression," in classical Latin especially "rhetorical utterance, oratorical expression," noun of action from past-participle stem of eloqui "to speak out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Related: Elocutionary; elocutionist.

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decorum (n.)

1560s, "that which is proper or fitting in a literary or artistic composition;" 1580s, "propriety of speech, behavior, or dress; formal politeness," from Latin decorum "that which is seemly," noun use of neuter of adjective decorus "fit, proper," from decor"beauty, elegance, charm, grace, ornament," from decus (genitive decoris) "an ornament," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept" (on the notion of "to add grace").

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serviette (n.)

"table napkin," late 15c., from Old French serviette "napkin, towel" (14c.), a word of obscure origin, probably from or somehow connected with the past participle of servir "to serve" (see serve (v.)). The English word was primarily Scottish at first, according to OED; it was re-introduced in literary English from French 1818. Spanish servilleta, Italian salvieta suggest folk-etymology changes somewhere.

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republication (n.)

1700, "a fresh promulgation" of a law, etc., from re- + publication, French republication (by 17c.), or else formed to go with republish (v.). By 1789 as "act of republishing, a new publication of something published before;" specifically as "a fresh publication of a literary work" by 1796, originally often especially a reprint in one country of a work published in another. A verb republicate was used 17c. as "make popular" (1660s).

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ambivalence (n.)

"simultaneous conflicting feelings," 1924 (1912 as ambivalency), from German Ambivalenz, coined 1910 by Swiss psychologist Eugen Bleuler on model of German Equivalenz "equivalence," etc., from Latin ambi- "both, on both sides" (see ambi-) + valentia "strength," abstract noun from present participle of valere "be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). A psychological term that by 1929 had taken on a broader literary and general sense.

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miscellany (n.)

"a mixture of various kinds; a medley; a combination of diverse objects, parts, or elements," 1590s, from Latin miscellanea "a writing on miscellaneous subjects," originally "meat hash, hodge-podge" (food for gladiators), neuter plural of miscellaneus "mixed," from miscere "to mix" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix"). From 1610s as "a diversified literary collection;" 1630s as "a book containing compositions on various subjects" (miscellanea in this sense is from 1570s).

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Crispin (n.)

"shoemaker," 1640s, in literary use only, from Ss. Crispin and Crispinian (martyred at Soissons c. 285), patrons of shoemakers. French hagiographers make the brothers noble Romans who, while they preached in Gaul, worked as shoemakers to avoid living on the alms of the faithful. Their day was Oct. 25. The name is Crispinus, a Roman cognomen, from Latin crispus "curly" (probably with reference to hair; see crisp (adj.)).

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aureate (adj.)
early 15c., "resembling gold, gold-colored," also figuratively, "splendid, brilliant," from Latin aureatus "decorated with gold," from aureus "golden," from aurum "gold," from PIE root *aus- (2) "gold" (source also of Sanskrit ayah "metal," Avestan ayo, Latin aes "brass," Old English ar "brass, copper, bronze," Gothic aiz "bronze," Old Lithuanian ausas "gold"), which is probably related to root *aus- (1) "to shine."

Especially of highly ornamented literary or rhetorical styles. Related: Aureation.
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