Etymology
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brutalization (n.)
1797, noun of action or state from brutalize.
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consciousness (n.)

1630s, "internal knowledge," from conscious + -ness. Meaning "state of being aware of what passes in one's own mind" is from 1670s; meaning "state of being aware" of anything is from 1746. Consciousness-raising is attested from 1968.

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premier (n.)

1711 in the political sense, "the first minister of a state," a shortening of premier minister (1680s); see premier (adj.). In U.S. usage, premier formerly was applied occasionally to the Secretary of State (late 19c.).

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hush (n.)
"state of stillness," 1680s, from hush (v.).
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nationhood (n.)

"state of being a nation," 1840, from nation + -hood.

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popularness (n.)

"state of being popular," 1727, from popular + -ness.

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imperium (n.)
"authority to command the national military forces," in extended use "an empire," 1650s, from Latin imperium "command, supreme authority, power" (see empire). Hence Latin phrase imperium in imperio "a state within a state."
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captivation (n.)

"state or condition of being enthralled by excellence or beauty," c. 1600, from Latin captivationem (nominative captivatio) "a subjugation, enslavement," noun of state from past-participle stem of captivare "to take, capture" (see captivate).

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understate (v.)
1781, from under + state (v.). Related: Understated; understating.
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bafflement (n.)
"state of being baffled," 1841, from baffle (v.) + -ment.
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