Etymology
Advertisement
burn (n.)
c. 1300, "act or operation of burning," from Old English bryne, from the same source as burn (v.). Until mid-16c. the usual spelling was brenne. Meaning "mark or injury made by burning" is from 1520s. Slow burn first attested 1938, in reference to U.S. movie actor Edgar Kennedy (1890-1948), who made it his specialty.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tort (n.)
mid-13c., "injury, wrong," from Old French tort "wrong, injustice, crime" (11c.), from Medieval Latin tortum "injustice," noun use of neuter of tortus "wrung, twisted," past participle of Latin torquere "turn, turn awry, twist, wring, distort" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist"). Legal sense of "breach of a duty, whereby someone acquires a right of action for damages" is first recorded 1580s.
Related entries & more 
concussion (n.)

c. 1400, "a bruising, contusion (to the head)," from Latin concussionem (nominative concussio) "a shaking, an earthquake," noun of action from past-participle stem of concutere "shake violently," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash).

From late 15c. as "act of shaking or agitation," especially by impact of another body; from 1540s as "brain injury caused by a fall or blow."

Related entries & more 
nuisance (n.)

c. 1400, "injury, hurt, harm," from Anglo-French nusaunce, Old French nuisance "harm, wrong, damage," from past-participle stem of nuire "to harm," from Latin nocere "to hurt" (from PIE root *nek- (1) "death"). Sense has softened over time, to "anything obnoxious to a community" (bad smells, pests, eyesores), 1660s, then "source of annoyance, something personally disagreeable" (1831). Applied to persons from 1690s. As an adjective by 1889; the older adjective nuisant was always rare and now is obsolete.

Related entries & more 
supprise (n.)
mid-15c., "injury, wrong, outrage," from supprise (v.) "overpower, subdue, put down; grieve, afflict" (c. 1400), also "take unawares, attack unexpectedly" (mid-15c.), from Anglo-French supprise, fem. past participle of supprendre, variant of sorprendre (see surprise (n.)). The noun later also had sense "oppression; surprise attack," but perhaps originally was an alternate form of surprise used in a specific sense.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
reparation (n.)

late 14c., reparacioun, "repair, act of mending" (a sense now rare or obsolete), also "amends, compensation, recompense, satisfaction for injury, what is done to repair a wrong," from Old French reparacion and directly from Late Latin reparationem (nominative reparatio) "act of repairing, restoration," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reparare "restore, repair" (see repair (v.1)).

Reparations "compensation for war damaged owed by the aggressor" is attested from 1921, with reference to Germany, from French réparations (1919).

Related entries & more 
pernicious (adj.)

early 15c., of a deed, "evil, wicked;" from 1520s as "having the property of destroying or being injurious," from Old French pernicios (13c., Modern French pernicieux) and directly from Latin perniciosus "destructive," from pernicies "destruction, death, ruin," from per "completely" (see per) + necis "violent death, murder," related to necare "to kill," nocere "to hurt, injure, harm," noxa "harm, injury" (from PIE root *nek- (1) "death"). Related: Perniciously; perniciousness.

Related entries & more 
punishment (n.)

late 14c., punishement, in law, "the assessing or inflicting of pain, suffering, loss, confinement, etc. on a person for a crime or offense," from Anglo-French punisement (late 13c.), Old French punissement, from punir (see punish).

From early 15c. as "suffering or hardship inflicted as punishment;" mid-15c. as "a penalty or sentence imposed as punishment." Gradually extended to "pain or injury inflicted" in a general sense; the meaning "rough handling" is from 1811, originally in fist-fighting.

Related entries & more 
recovery (n.)

mid-14c., "a return to health after illness, injury, misfortune, etc.," from Anglo-French recoverie (c. 1300), Old French recovree "remedy, cure, recovery," from past-participle stem of recovrer (see recover).

The meaning "a gaining possession (of property) by legal action" is from early 15c. The general (non-legal) sense of "act or power of regaining or retaking" (something lost or taken away) is by 1530s. That of "act of righting oneself after a blunder, mishap, etc." is from 1520s. The meaning "restoration from a bad to a good condition" is from 1580s.

Related entries & more 
resentment (n.)

"deep sense of injury, the excitement of passion which proceeds from a sense of wrong offered to one's self or one's kindred or friends," especially when directed at the author of the affront, 1610s, from French ressentiment (16c.), verbal noun from ressentir (see resent). Slightly earlier in English in the French form resentiment (1590s); also compare ressentiment.

"Ridicule often parries resentment, but resentment never yet parried ridicule." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
Related entries & more 

Page 8