Etymology
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ascendance (n.)

1742, from ascend + -ance. According to OED, properly "the act of ascending," but used from the start in English as a synonym of ascendancy "state of being in the ascendant, governing or controlling influence."

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lobby (n.)
1550s, "cloister, covered walk," from Medieval Latin laubia, lobia "covered walk in a monastery," from a Germanic source (compare Old High German louba "hall, roof;" see lodge (n.)).

Meaning "large entrance hall in a public building" is from 1590s; in reference to the House of Commons from 1630s. Political sense of "those who seek to influence legislation" is attested by 1790s in American English, in reference to the custom of influence-seekers gathering in the large entrance-halls outside legislative chambers.
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Svengali 

"one who exerts controlling or mesmeric influence on another," by 1914, from the hypnotist character of that name in the novel "Trilby" (1894) by George Du Maurier.

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neocolonialism (n.)

also neo-colonialism, "the exertion of influence or control over other nations, especially former dependencies, without direct military or political control," 1955, from neo- "new" + colonialism.

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Tangier 
port city of Morocco, Latin Tinge, said to be named for Tingis, daughter of Atlas, but probably from Semitic tigisis "harbor." In English often Tangiers, by influence of Algiers.
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numerical (adj.)

"pertaining to or relating to number, denoting number," 1620s, from Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)) + -ical. Perhaps by influence of French numérique "of a number or numbers." Related: Numerically.

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buckaroo (n.)
"cowboy," 1907, American English, earlier buckayro (1889), bakhara (1827), from Spanish vaquero "cowboy," from vaca "cow," from Latin vacca, a word of uncertain origin. Spelling altered by influence of buck (n.1).
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runnel (n.)

"rivulet, small stream of water," 1570s (Hakluyt), an alteration (by influence of run) of Middle English ryneil, from Old English rinelle, rynel, a diminutive with -el (2) + ryne "a stream" (see run (n.)).

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sensationalize (v.)

by 1847 in philosophy; by 1863 in journalism, from sensational + -ize. Originally of audiences ("subject to the influence of sensation") as well as topics ("exaggerate in a sensational manner"). Related: Sensationalized; sensationalizing.

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eyelet (n.)

"small hole," late 14c., oilet, from Old French oeillet, diminutive of oeil "eye," from Latin oculus "an eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Spelling later modified by influence of eye (n.).

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