Etymology
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ignition (n.)

1610s, "act of heating to the point of combustion," from French ignition or directly from Medieval Latin ignitionem (nominative ignitio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin ignire "set on fire," from ignis "fire" (see igneous). Meaning "means of sparking a fire" (originally in a gun) is from 1881; meaning "means of sparking an internal combustion engine" is from 1906.

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turret (n.)

c. 1300, touret "small tower forming part of a city wall or castle," from Old French torete (12c., Modern French tourette), diminutive of tour "tower," from Latin turris (see tower (n.1)). Meaning "low, flat gun-tower on a warship" is recorded from 1862, later also of tanks. Related: Turreted. Welsh twrd is from English.

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shooter (n.)

Middle English shetere, "one who shoots" (an arrow, etc.), from Old English sceotere, agent noun from shoot (v.). As "implement for shooting, gun" of a specified kind, by 1812; as a small alcoholic drink, by 1971 (a variant on shot (n.) in this sense). Shootee is attested from 1837.

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snapshot (n.)

also snap-shot, 1808, in hunting, "a quick shot with a gun, without aim, at a fast-moving target," from snap + shot (n.). The sense of "photograph shot with a hand-held camera" is attested from 1890. Figuratively, of something captured at a moment in time, from 1897. As a verb by 1894.

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kick (n.)

1520s, "a blow or thrust with the foot," from kick (v.). Meaning "recoil (of a gun) when fired" is from 1826. Meaning "surge or fit of pleasure" (often as kicks) is from 1941; originally "stimulation from liquor or drugs" (1844). Hence kickster "one who lives for kicks" (1963). The kick "the fashion" is from c. 1700. Kicks in slang also has meant "trousers" (1700), "shoes" (1904).

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ramrod (n.)

1757, "a rod used in ramming" (the charge of a gun or other firearm), from ram (v.) + rod (n.). Used figuratively for straightness or stiffness by 1939; also figurative of formality or primness (ramroddy, 1886). The verb in the figurative meaning "to force or drive as with a ramrod" is by 1948. Related: Ramrodded; ramrodding.

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tampion (n.)

early 15c., "plug, bung," from a nasalized variant of Old French tapon "piece of cloth to stop a hole" (14c.), a suffixed form of Frankish *tappo "stopper, plug," related to Old High German zapfo and Old English tæppa "stopper" (see tap (n.1)). Meaning "wooden plug for the muzzle of a gun" (to keep out rain or seawater) is recorded from 1620s.

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smoking (n.)

late 14c., smokyng, "emission of fumes or smoke," verbal noun from smoke (v.). By 1690s as "act of puffing a lighted cigar, pipe, etc." Also a past-participle adjective. The railway smoking car is attested from 1846. Smoking jacket, one worn while smoking, is by 1849. Smoking gun in the figurative sense of "incontestable evidence" is attested by 1974.

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chassis (n.)

"base frame of an automobile," 1903, American English; earlier "sliding frame or carriage-base for a large gun" (1869), "window frame" (1660s), from French châssis "frame," Old French chassiz (13c.) "frame, framework, setting," from chasse "case, box, eye socket, snail's shell, setting (of a jewel)," from Latin capsa "box, case" (see case (n.2)) + French -is, collective suffix for a number of parts taken together. Compare sash (n.2).

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trigger (n.)

"device by means of which a catch or spring is released and a mechanism set in action," 1650s, earlier tricker (1620s), from Dutch trekker "trigger," from trekken "to pull" (see trek). Tricker was the usual form in English until c. 1750. Trigger-finger "forefinger as used to pull the trigger of a gun" is attested by 1814. Trigger-happy "ready to shoot (or otherwise react violently) on the slightest provocation" is attested from 1942.

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