Etymology
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co-author (n.)

also coauthor, "one who writes (a book, journal article, etc.) along with another," 1850, from co- + author (n.). From 1948 as a verb. Related: Co-authored; co-authoring.

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transit (v.)
Origin and meaning of transit
mid-15c., from Latin transitus, past participle of transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Astronomical sense is from 1680s. Related: Transited; transiting.
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degression (n.)

"a stepping down, descent" (obsolete), late 15c., from Latin degressionem (nominative degressio) "a going down," noun of action from past-participle stem of degredi "to go down, march down, descend," from de- "down" (see de-) + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

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sandpiper (n.)

common name of a small wading bird that runs along the sand and utters a piping note, 1670s, from sand (n.) + piper.

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prestidigitation (n.)

"sleight of hand; the performance of feats requiring dexterity and skill, particularly of the fingers," 1843, from French prestidigitation, which was coined along with prestidigitator (q.v.).

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rehearse (v.)

c. 1300, rehersen, "to give an account of, report, tell, narrate (a story); speak or write words;" early 14c., "repeat, reiterate;" from Anglo-French rehearser, Old French rehercier (12c.) "to go over again, repeat," literally "to rake over, turn over" (soil, ground), from re- "again" (see re-) + hercier "to drag, trail (on the ground), be dragged along the ground; rake, harrow (land); rip, tear, wound; repeat, rehearse;" from herse "a harrow" (see hearse (n.)).

The meaning "to say over again, repeat what has already been said or written" is from mid-14c. in English; the sense of "practice (a play, part, etc.) in private to prepare for a public performance" is from 1570s (transitive and intransitive). Related: Rehearsed; rehearsing.

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vade-mecum (n.)
"a pocket manual, handbook," 1620s, Latin, literally "go with me;" from imperative of vadere "to go" (see vamoose) + me "me" + cum "with."
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Calais 
city on the French coast of the English Channel, from Gaulish Caleti, the name of a Celtic people who once lived along the shore there.
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telepathy (n.)

1882, coined (along with telæsthesia) by English psychologist Frederic Myers, literally "feeling from afar," from tele- + -pathy. The noun telepath is an 1889 back-formation.

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cation (n.)

1834, from Latinized form of Greek kation "going down," neuter present participle of katienai "to go down," from kata "down" (see cata-) + ienai "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Proposed by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, and published by English physicist Michael Faraday. Compare ion.

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