Etymology
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centrifugal (adj.)

"flying off or proceeding out from a center," 1690s, with adjectival suffix -al (1) + Modern Latin centrifugus, 1687, coined by Sir Isaac Newton in "Principia" (which is written in Latin), from Latin centri-, alternative combining form of centrum "center" (see center (n.)) + fugere "to flee" (see fugitive (adj.)). Centrifugal force is Newton's vis centrifuga.

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projectile (n.)

"body projected or impelled forward by force," 1660s, from Modern Latin projectilis, from Latin proiectus, past participle of proicere "stretch out, throw forth," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + combining form of iacere (past participle iactus) "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Specifically "a missile intended to be shot from a cannon by explosion of gunpowder, etc."

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slam (v.)
1690s, "to beat, slap;" 1775 as "to shut with force," from slam (n.1). Meaning "throw or push with force" is from 1870. Meaning "say uncomplimentary things about" is from 1916. Related: Slammed; slamming.
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prize (v.2)

"to force or press; force open by means of a lever," 1680s, from prize (n.) "the hold of a lever" (14c.), from Old French prise "a taking hold, a grasp" (see prize (n.2)). Related: Prized; prizing.

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forceful (adj.)
1570s, from force (n.) + -ful. Related: Forcefully; forcefulness.
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dynamics (n.)

as a branch of physics that calculates motions in accordance with the laws of force, by 1752, from dynamic (adj.); also see -ics. As "the moving physical or moral force in anything," by 1833.

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dynamism (n.)

1831, "dynamic energy, force, drive," from Greek dynamis "power, might, strength" (see dynamic (adj.)) + -ism. As a name for philosophical systems that require some force to explain the phenomena of nature, by 1857.

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enforce (v.)

mid-14c., "to drive by physical force; to try, attempt, strive; to fortify, strengthen a place;" late 14c. as "exert force, compel; make stronger, reinforce; strengthen an argument; grow stronger, become violent," from Old French enforcier "strengthen, reinforce; use force (on), offer violence (to); oppress; violate, rape" (12c.) or a native formation from en- (1) "make, put in" + force (n.). Meaning "compel obedience to" (a law, etc.) is from 1640s. Related: Enforced; enforcing.

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voltage (n.)
"electromotive force reckoned in volts," 1882, from volt + -age.
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