Etymology
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Guido 

masc. proper name, Italian, literally "leader," of Germanic origin (see guide (v.)). As a type of gaudy machoism often associated with Italian-Americans, 1980s, teen slang, from the name of character in Hollywood film "Risky Business" (1983).

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mondo (adj.)

"very much, extreme," 1979, from Italian mondo "world" (from Latin mundus; see mundane); specifically from "Mondo cane," title of a 1961 film, literally "world for a dog" (English title "A Dog's Life"), depicting eccentric human behavior. The word was abstracted from the title and taken as an intensifier.

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snuff (v.1)

"to cut or pinch off the burned part of a candle wick," mid-15c., from noun snoffe "burned part of a candle wick" (late 14c.), of unknown origin, perhaps related to snuff (v.2). The meaning "to die" is from 1865; that of "to kill" is from 1932; snuff-film, originally an urban legend, is from 1975.

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musical (n.)

"film or theatrical piece (other than opera) in which music figures prominently," 1937, from musical (adj.) in musical play. Earlier as a noun it meant "musical instrument" (c. 1500), "musical performance" (1570s); "musical party" (1823, a sense now in musicale).

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gaffer (n.)

1580s, "elderly rustic," apparently (based on continental analogies) a contraction of godfather (compare gammer). Originally a term of respect, also applied familiarly; from "old man" it was extended by 1841 to foremen and supervisors, which sense carried over in early 20c. to "electrician in charge of lighting on a film set."

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splice (v.)

1520s, originally a sailors' word, from Middle Dutch splissen "to splice" (Dutch splitsen), from Proto-Germanic *spli-, from PIE root *(s)plei- "to split, splice" (see flint). The Dutch word was borrowed in French as épisser. Used of motion picture film from 1912; of DNA from 1975. Related: Spliced; splicing; splicer.

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flick (n.)

mid-15c., "light blow or stroke," probably imitative of a light blow with a whip. Earliest recorded use is in phrase not worth a flykke "useless." Meaning "quick turn of the wrist" is from 1897 in sports. As slang for "film," it is first attested 1926, a back-formation from flicker (v.), from their flickering appearance.

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verity (n.)

late 14c., from Anglo-French and Old French verite "truth, sincerity, loyalty" (12c.), from Latin veritatem (nominative veritas) "truth, truthfulness," from verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy"). Modern French vérité, literally "truth," was borrowed into English 1966 as a term for naturalism or realism in film, etc.

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stooge (n.)

1913, "stage assistant, actor who assists a comedian," of uncertain origin, perhaps an alteration of student (with the mispronunciation STOO-jent) in sense of "apprentice." Meaning "lackey, person used for another's purpose" first recorded 1937. The Three Stooges film slapstick act debuted in movies in 1930, originally as "Ted Healy and His Stooges."

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remake (v.)

also re-make, "make anew, reconstruct," 1630s, from re- "back, again" + make (v.). Related: Remade; remaking. As a noun, in reference to movies, "a new making of a film or script (typically with different actors)," by 1933 ("Smilin' Through"). The verb was used of movies by 1910s).

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