Etymology
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darn (v.)

"to mend (fabric) by interweaving yarn or thread to fill a rent or hole," c. 1600, of unknown origin. Perhaps from French darner "mend," from darne "a piece, a slice," from Breton darn "piece, fragment, part." Alternative etymology is from obsolete dern "secret, hidden." Related: Darned; darning.

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polymer (n.)

a substance built from a large number of simple molecules of the same kind, 1855, probably from German Polymere (Berzelius, 1830), from Greek polymeres "having many parts," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + meros "part" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (2) "to get a share of something").

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pall (v.)

"become tiresome or insipid," 1700, a surviving transferred or figurative sense from the earlier meaning "become faint, fail in strength," from Middle English pallen (late 14c.), which is apparently [OED] a shortened form of appallen "to dismay, fill with horror or disgust" (see appall). Related: Palled; palling.

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line (v.1)
"to cover the inner side of" (clothes, garments, etc.), late 14c., from Old English lin "linen cloth" (see linen). Linen was frequently used in the Middle Ages as a second layer of material on the inner side of a garment. Hence, by extension, "to fill the insides of" (1510s). Related: Lined; lining.
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pep (n.)

"vigor, energy," 1912, shortened form of pepper (n.), which was used in the figurative sense of "spirit, energy" from at least 1847. Pep rally "meeting to inspire enthusiasm" is attested from 1915; pep talk is from 1926. To pep (something) up "fill or inspire with vigor or energy" is from 1925.

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polymorphous (adj.)

"having or exhibiting many or various forms," 1785, from Greek polymorphos "multiform, of many forms, manifold," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + morphē "shape, form," a word of uncertain etymology. Especially of insects: "undergoing a series of marked changes during development." Related: Polymorphic; polymorphously; polymorphousness.

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suffuse (v.)

"to overspread," as with a fluid or tincture, "fill or cover," as with something fluid, 1580s, from Latin suffusus, past participle of suffundere "overspread, pour beneath, pour upon," from sub "under" (see sub-) + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Related: Suffused; suffusing.

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tear (v.2)
early 15c., "shed tears," 1650s, "fill with tears" mainly in American English, from tear (n.1). Related: Teared; tearing. Old English verb tæherian, tearian "to weep" did not survive into Middle English.
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polysemy (n.)

"fact of having multiple meanings," 1900, from French polysémie (1897), from Medieval Latin polysemus, from Greek polysemos "of many senses or meanings," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + sēma "sign" (see semantic). Related: Polysemic.

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spite (v.)
c. 1400, "dislike, regard with ill will," from spite (n.). Meaning "treat maliciously" is from 1590s (as in "cut off (one's) nose to spite (one's) face"); earlier "fill with vexation, offend" (1560s). Related: Spited; spiting.
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