Etymology
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systematic (adj.)
1670s, "pertaining to a system," from French systématique or directly from Late Latin systematicus, from Greek systematikos "combined in a whole," from systema (genitive systematos); see system. From 1789 as "methodical," often in a bad sense, "ruthlessly methodical." Related: Systematical (1660s); systematically.
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MI5 
1939, from abbreviation of Military Intelligence, followed by the department number.
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Babism (n.)
religious and social system founded in 19c. Persia, 1850; see Baha'i.
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commuter (n.)

"one who goes back and forth to work," 1865, American English, originally "holder of a commutation ticket," agent noun from commute (v.).

A commutation ticket (1848) was a ticket issued (by a railroad, etc.) at a reduced rate entitling the holder to travel over a given route a limited number of times or an unlimited number of times over a certain period. It is from commute in its sense of "to change one kind of payment into another" (1795), especially "to combine a number of payments into a single one, pay a single sum instead of a number of successive payments" (1845). 

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feudalism (n.)
a coinage of historians, attested from 1773; see feudal + -ism. Feudal system attested from 1736.
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parasympathetic (adj.)

in reference to major divisions of the nervous system, 1905, from para- (1) "beside" + sympathetic.

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maglev 

system of rail transportation using two sets of magnets, 1973, a contraction of magnetic levitation.

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colonialist (n.)

"supporter of a colonial system," by 1850, from colonial + -ist; compare colonist.

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mainframe (n.)
"central processor of a computer system," 1964, from main (adj.) + frame (n.).
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acreage (n.)
"number of acres in a tract of land," 1795, from acre + -age.
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