Etymology
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liminal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a threshold," 1870, from Latin limen "threshold, cross-piece, sill" (see limit (n.)) + -al (1). Related: Liminality.

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hybridize (v.)

1802, intransitive, "cross or inter-breed," from hybrid + -ize. Transitive sense of "cause to interbreed" is by 1823. Related: Hybridized; hybridizing.

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ceriph (n.)

"fine cross-line as a finish at the top or bottom of a letter," an alternative spelling of serif (q.v.); also see sans-serif.

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clechy (adj.)

also cleché, 1680s, "pierced through with a figure of the same kind," but also, of a cross, "having arms which spread or grow broader toward the extremities," from French cléché (17c.), from Latin *clavicatus "key-holed," or clavicella "little key," from clavis "key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook"). The cross sense perhaps from or merged with Latin clava "club, knotty branch."

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frump (n.)

"cross, unstylish person," especially a woman or girl, 1817, from a group of related words of uncertain origin: Frump (n.) "a mocking speech" (1550s), "a sneer or snort" (1580s); frump (v.) "to mock, flout, taunt" (1570s); frumps (n.) "ill-humor" (1660s); frumpish (adj.) "cross-tempered" (1640s); and compare frumpy.

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gallows (n.)

c. 1300, plural of Middle English galwe "gallows" (mid-13c.), from Old Norse galgi "gallows," or from Old English galga (Mercian), gealga (West Saxon) "gallows;" all from Proto-Germanic *galgon "pole" (source also of Old Frisian galga, Old Saxon galgo, Middle High German galge "gallows, cross," German Galgen "gallows," Gothic galga "cross"), from PIE *ghalgh- "branch, rod" (source also of Lithuanian žalga "pole, perch," Armenian dzalk "pole").

In Old English, also used of the cross of the crucifixion. Plural because made of two poles. Gallows-tree is Old English galg-treow. Gallows humor (1876) translates German Galgenhumor.

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crossly (adv.)

"irritably," 1730; earlier "adversely, unfavorably," also "athwart, intersecting something else" (both 1590s), from cross (adj.) + -ly (2).

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trans- 

word-forming element meaning "across, beyond, through, on the other side of, to go beyond," from Latin trans (prep.) "across, over, beyond," perhaps originally present participle of a verb *trare-, meaning "to cross," from PIE *tra-, variant of root *tere- (2) "cross over, pass through, overcome." In chemical use indicating "a compound in which two characteristic groups are situated on opposite sides of an axis of a molecule" [Flood].

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boysenberry (n.)

large bramble-fruit, a cross between several species, 1935, developed early 1900s by California botanist Rudolf Boysen (1895-1950) and named for him.

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