Etymology
Advertisement
pard (n.2)

"accomplice, companion," 1850, a dialectal shortening of pardner, pardener (1795), which represents a common pronunciation of partner (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
koine (n.)

common literary dialect of Greek in the Roman and early medieval period, 1903, from feminine singular of Greek koinos "common, ordinary" (see coeno-). Used earlier as a Greek word in English. From 1926 of other dialects in similar general use.

[Isocrates] helped to lay the foundations for that invaluable vehicle of civilization, the Koinê Dialektos, through which, at the price of becoming easy, flat, common, and a little soulless, the Greek language in the Hellenistic period evangelized the whole Mediterranean world. [Gilbert Murray, "Greek Studies," 1946]
Related entries & more 
unsociable (adj.)

c. 1600, from un- (1) "not" + sociable (adj.). Insociable is older (1580s) but less common.

Related entries & more 
unpopular (adj.)

1640s, from un- (1) "not" + popular (adj.). Related: Unpopularly. Less common impopular is attested from 1721.

Related entries & more 
Cristina 

fem. proper name, the native form of Latin Christiana, fem. of Christianus (see Christian). In the Middle Ages, the masculine form of the name (Cristian) was less popular in England than the feminine, though Christian was common in Brittany. Surnames Christie, Chrystal, etc. represent common Northern and Scottish pet forms of the names.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gens (n.)

1847, in reference to ancient Rome, "tribe, clan, house (of families having a name and certain religious rites in common and a presumed common origin)," from Latin gens (genitive gentis) "race, clan, nation" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

Related entries & more 
teleconference (n.)

1952, originally a proprietary name, from tele- + conference. Not in common use until c. 1974.

Related entries & more 
incommensurate (adj.)

"not of equal measure; not having a common measure," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + commensurate.

Related entries & more 
majorly (adv.)

by 1887, from major (adj.) + -ly (2). Common in popular U.S. colloquial speech from c. 1995.

Related entries & more 
dextrous (adj.)

1620s, alternative spelling of dexterous; this version is more conformable to Latin but less common in English.

Related entries & more 

Page 8