Etymology
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conflate (v.)

mid-15c., "to mold or cast from molten metal" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin conflatus, past participle of conflare "to blow up, kindle, light; bring together, compose," also "to melt together," literally "to blow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + flare "to blow" (from PIE root *bhle- "to blow").

From c. 1600 as "to bring together from various sources." In reference to text, "to form by inadvertent combination of two readings of the same words," from 1885.

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conference (n.)
Origin and meaning of conference

1550s, "act of consulting together," from French confrence (15c.), from Medieval Latin conferentia, from Latin conferens, present participle of conferre "to bring together; deliberate, talk over," literally "to bring together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children"). Meaning "formal meeting for consultation, discussion, instruction, exchange of opinions, etc.," is from 1580s. As a verb from 1846 (implied in conferencing).

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recall (v.)

1580s, "call back from a distance, to bring back by calling upon," from re- "back, again, to a former state" + call (v.); in some cases a loan-translation of French rappeler (see repeal (v.)) or Latin revocare "to rescind, call back" (see revoke).

A Latin-Germanic hybrid. The meaning "to revoke, take back, countermand" is by 1580s. The sense of "bring back to memory, call back to the mind or perception" is attested from 1610s. Related: Recalled; recalling.

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regiment (v.)

"to form into a regiment" with proper officers, hence "to organize, bring under a definite system of authority," 1610s, from regiment (n.). General sense of "organize systematically" is from 1690s. Related: Regimented; regimenting.

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gender (v.)
Origin and meaning of gender
"to bring forth," late 14c., from Old French gendrer, genrer "engender, beget, give birth to," from Latin generare "to engender, beget, produce" (see generation). Related: Gendered; gendering.
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regenerate (adj.)

"reborn, reproduced, restored," mid-15c., from Latin regeneratus, past participle of regenerare "bring forth again" (see regeneration). Especially in theology, "changed from a natural to a spiritual state."

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peacemaker (n.)

"one who makes peace," as by reconciling parties that are at variance," early 15c., pesmaker; see peace + maker. To make peace "bring about reconciliation" is from c. 1300. Related: Peacemaking.

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subordinate (v.)
"to bring into a subordinate position to something else, to make of less value, to make auxiliary or dependent," 1590s, from Medieval Latin subordinatus (see subordinate (adj.)). Related: Subordinated; subordinating.
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dock (v.2)

 "to bring or place (a ship) into a dock," 1510s, from dock (n.1). Intransitive sense of "to come into a dock" is by 1892. Of spaceships, by 1951. Related: Docked; docking

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calve (v.)
"to bring forth a calf or calves," Old English cealfian, from cealf "calf" (see calf (n.1)). Of glaciers, "to lose a portion by an iceberg breaking off," 1837. Related: Calved; calving.
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