Etymology
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consanguinity (n.)

"kinship by common descent," c. 1400, from Old French consanguinité and directly from Latin consanguinitatem (nominative consanguinitas), from consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

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bloodless (adj.)
Old English blodleas, "drained of blood;" see blood (n.) + -less. The figurative sense in Middle English was "powerless, without spirit or energy." Meaning "free from bloodshed" is from c. 1600; that of "cold-hearted" is from 1881. Related: Bloodlessly.
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broil (v.2)
early 15c., "to quarrel, brawl," also "mix up, present in disorder," from Anglo-French broiller "mix up, confuse," Old French brooillier "to mix, mingle," figuratively "to have sexual intercourse" (13c., Modern French brouiller), perhaps from breu, bro "stock, broth, brew," from Frankish or another Germanic source (compare Old High German brod "broth"), from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." Compare Italian brogliare "to stir, disorder" (see imbroglio).
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cardiovascular (adj.)
also cardio-vascular, "pertaining to both the heart and the blood vessels," 1870, from cardio- + vascular. Cardiovascular system is recorded by 1918.
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cupping (n.)

1510s, "surgical operation to draw blood by means of a cupping-glass," verbal noun from cup (v.).

There are two modes of cupping: one in which the part is scarified and some blood taken away to relieve congestion or inflammation of internal parts, called wet cupping, or more generally simply cupping; and a second, termed dry cupping, in which there is no scarification no blood is abstracted. [Century Dictionary, 1897]
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indiscipline (n.)
"disorder, lack of discipline," 1783, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + discipline (n.). Perhaps modeled on French indiscipline (18c.). Indisciplined as a past-participle adjective is attested from c. 1400.
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derange (v.)

1776, "throw into confusion, disturb the regular order of," from French déranger, from Old French desrengier "disarrange, throw into disorder," from des- "do the opposite of" (see dis-) + Old French rengier (Modern French ranger) "to put into line," from reng "line, row," from Frankish *hring or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz "circle, ring, something curved," from nasalized form of PIE root *sker- (2) "to turn, bend." Mental sense "disorder or unsettle the mind of" is by c. 1790.

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angiogenesis (n.)
"development of new blood vessels," 1896, from angio- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."
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red-blooded (adj.)

1802, "having red or reddish blood," from red (adj.1) + blood (n.). "Specifically noting the higher worms, or annelids, in which, however, the blood is often greenish" [Century Dictionary]. The figurative meaning "vigorous, spirited" is recorded by 1862.

The children born in California are certainly a great improvement upon those born among us. Nowhere can more rosy specimens of health and beauty be found. Strong-limbed, red-blooded, graceful, and as full of happy animal life as young fawns, they bid fair to develop into admirable types of manhood and womanhood. [Bayard Taylor, "New Pictures from California" 1862]
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hemorrhoids (n.)
plural of hemorrhoid; late 14c., emeroudis, from Old French emorroides (13c.), from Latin hæmorrhoidae, from Greek haimorrhoides (phlebes) "(veins) liable to discharge blood," plural of haimorrhois, from haima "blood" (see -emia) + rhoos "a stream, a flowing," from rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Related: Hemmorhoidal.
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