Etymology
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monotype (n.)

1881 in biology, "the single or sole type of a species in its genus, a genus in its family, etc.;" 1882 in printers' arts, "a print from a picture painted on a metal plate" (only one proof can be made, as the picture is transferred to the paper); 1893 as a brand name of typesetting machine; see mono- + type. Related: Monotypic (1878 in the biological sense)

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ento- 
word-forming element used chiefly in biology and meaning "within, inside, inner," from Greek ento-, combining form of entos (adv., prep.) "within, inside," as a noun, "inner parts" (cognate with Latin intus), from PIE *entos-, extended form of root *en "in," with adverbial suffix *-tos, denoting origin.
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procumbent (adj.)

1660s, in biology, "unable to support itself, lying on the ground without putting forth roots," from Latin procumbentem (nominative procumbens), present participle of procumbere "to fall forward, fall prostrate," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + -cumbere "take a reclining position," related to cubare "lie down" (see cubicle). The meaning "leaning forward, lying on the face" is from 1721. Related: Procumbently.

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inarticulate (adj.)
c. 1600, "not clear or intelligible" (of speech); "not jointed or hinged, not composed of segments connected by joints" (in biology), from Late Latin inarticulatus "not articulate, not distinct," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + articulatus, past participle of articulare "to separate into joints; to utter distinctly" (see articulation). Of persons, "not able to speak clearly," 1754. Related: Inarticulately; inarticulateness; inarticulable.
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anamorphosis (n.)

"distorted projection or drawing" (one that looks normal from a particular angle or with a certain mirror), 1727, from Greek anamorphōsis "transformation," noun of action from anamorphoein "to transform," from ana "up" (see ana-) + morphōsis, from morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. In botany, "monstrous development of a part" (1830); in evolutionary biology, "gradual change of form in a species over time" (1852).

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receptor (n.)

mid-15c. (late 13c., Anglo-French), receptour, "a knowing harborer of criminals, heretics, etc.," from Old French receptour or directly from Latin receptor, agent noun from recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive). Molecular biology sense is from 1900. Compare receiver. A receptory (early 15c., from Medieval Latin) was, among other definitions, an alchemical flask for receiving distillates.

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atavism (n.)

1833, in biology, "reversion by influence of heredity to ancestral characteristics, resemblance of a given organism to some remote ancestor, return to an early or original type," from French atavisme, attested by 1820s, said to have been coined by French botanist Antoine-Nicolas Duchesne, from Latin atavus "ancestor, forefather," from at- perhaps here meaning "beyond" + avus "grandfather" (from PIE *awo- "adult male relative other than the father;" see uncle).

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hamadryad (n.)

late 14c., from Greek hamadryas (plural hamadryades) "wood-nymph," fabled to die with her tree, from hama "together with" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with") + dryas (plural dryades) "wood nymph," from drus (genitive dryos) "tree," especially "oak" (from PIE root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast," with specialized senses "wood, tree"). Use in 19c. biology for a type of butterfly, a type of venomous Indian serpent, and a type of large hairy baboon.

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cloaca (n.)

1650s, euphemism for "underground sewer," from Latin cloaca "public sewer, drain," from cluere "to cleanse," probably from PIE root *kleu- "to wash, clean" (source also of Greek klyzein "to dash over, wash off, rinse out," klysma "liquid used in a washing;" Lithuanian šluoju, šluoti "to sweep;" Old English hlutor, Gothic hlutrs, Old High German hlutar, German lauter "pure, clear"). Use in biology, in reference to eliminatory systems of lower animals, is from 1834. Related: Cloacal (1650s); cloacinal (1857).

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nucleus (n.)

1704, "kernel of a nut;" 1708, "head of a comet;" from Latin nucleus "kernel," from nucula "little nut," diminutive of nux (genitive nucis) "nut," from PIE *kneu- "nut" (source also of Middle Irish cnu, Welsh cneuen, Middle Breton knoen "nut," Old Norse hnot, Old English hnutu "nut").

The general sense of "central mass or thing, about which others cluster or matter collects," is from 1762. In biology, "dense, typically rounded structure in a cell, bounded by membranes," from 1831. Later they were found to contain the genetic material. Modern meaning in physics, "positively charged central core of an atom," is from 1912, by Ernest Rutherford, though theoretical use for "central point of an atom" is from 1844, in Faraday.

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