Etymology
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backlist (n.)
1934 in publisher's jargon, "books that have been in publication for some time (prior to the current season) and are still in print;" see back (adj.) + list (n.1). As a verb, "to put on the back list," from 1983. Related: Backlisted.
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backlog (n.)
also back-log, 1680s, "large log placed at the back of a fire" to keep the blaze going and concentrate the heat; see back (adj.) + log (n.1). Figurative sense of "something stored up for later use" is first attested 1883, but this and the meaning "arrears of unfulfilled orders" (1932) might be from, or suggested by, log (n.2).
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backorder 
also back-order, by 1980 (n.); 1985 (v.); see back (adj.) + order. Related: Backordered.
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backpack (n.)

also back-pack, 1904, "bag with shoulder straps that allow it to be carried on a person's back," from back (n.) + pack (n.). By 1916 as a verb, "to hike while carrying supplies in a backpack." Related: Backpacked; backpacking.

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backpedal (v.)
also back-pedal, 1883, in bicycling; see back (adv.) + pedal (v.). Related: Backpedalling (1887).
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backscratcher (n.)
also back-scratcher, 1834; see back (n.) + scratch (v.).
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backside (n.)
"the rear part of anything," c. 1400, from back (adj.) + side (n.). In the specific sense of "rump of an animal, buttocks" it is recorded by c. 1500.
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back-slang (n.)
"words pronounced or written backwards or nearly so," 1860, from back (adj. or adv.) + slang (n.).
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backslash (n.)
punctuation symbol introduced for computer purposes, by 1977, from back (adj.) + slash (n.).
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backslide (v.)
in the religious sense "abandon faith or devotions, apostatize," 1580s, from back (adv.) + slide (v.). Related: Backslider; backsliding (1550s).
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