Etymology
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ambisexual (adj.)
"unisex" (of clothing), also "bisexual," 1912 in the jargon of psychology, from ambi- + sexual. Ambosexous (1650s) and ambosexual (1935) both were used in the sense "hermaphrodite." Ambisextrous is recorded from 1929 as a humorous coinage based on ambidextrous.
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Izod 

clothing manufacturer trendy in the 1970s and 1980s, the company name was bought in 1930s from A.J. Izod, a London tailoring establishment. The surname (also Izzard, etc.) goes back to the Middle Ages and might be related to the proper name Isold.

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duck (n.2)

"strong, untwilled linen (later cotton) fabric," used for sails and sailors' clothing, 1630s, from Dutch doeck "linen cloth" (Middle Dutch doec), from Proto-Germanic *dōkaz, a word of uncertain etymology (source also of German Tuch "piece of cloth," Danish dug, Old Frisian dok, Old High German tuoh).

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wrinkle (n.)
"fold or crease in the extenal body," late 14c.; in cloth or clothing from early 15c., probably from wrinkle (v.). Meaning "defect, problem" first recorded 1640s; that of "idea, device, notion" (especially a new one) is from 1817.
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trademark (n.)

also trade-mark, 1838 (the thing itself is attested continuously from 14c., apparently the originals were watermarks on paper), from trade (n.) + mark (n.1) in a specialized sense of "stamp, seal, brand, etc. placed upon an article top indicate ownership or origin" (mid-13c.).

Figurative use by 1869. As a verb, from 1899 (trade-marked). Related: Trademarked; trademarking. This sense of mark also yielded the meaning "particular brand or make of an article" (1660s), hence its use in 20c. names of cars, etc., Mark I,Mark II, etc.

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byline (n.)
also by-line, 1926, "line giving the name of the writer of an article in a newspaper or magazine;" it typically reads BY ________. From by (prep.) + line (n.). As a verb by 1942. Related: Bylined.
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paisley (n.)
1834 as a type of clothing or material, from Paisley, town in southwest Scotland, where the cloth was originally made. As an adjective by 1900. The town name is literally "church," from Middle Irish baslec, itself from Latin basilica (see basilica).
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producer (n.)

1510s, "one who or that which produces;" agent noun from produce (v.). Of entertainments, from 1891; in political economy, "one who causes any article to have an exchangeable value" (opposed to consumer), by 1714 (John Locke).

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jabot (n.)
1823, "frill of a men's shirt," from French jabot "gizzard (of a bird), frill on a shirt front" (16c.), a word of unknown origin. Klein suggests a connection with gaver "to cram, gorge," and thus ultimately with English jaw (n.). Of women's clothing from 1869.
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dud (n.)

1825, "person in ragged clothing," from duds (q.v.). Sense extended by 1897 to "counterfeit thing," and 1908 to "useless, inefficient person or thing." This led naturally in World War I to "shell which fails to explode," and thence to "expensive failure."

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