Etymology
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ship-load (n.)

"a number or amount (of persons or things) carried or capable of being carried in a ship," 1630s, from ship (n.) + load (n.).

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worth (n.)
Old English weorþ "value, price, price paid; worth, worthiness, merit; equivalent value amount, monetary value," from worth (adj.). From c. 1200 as "excellence, nobility."
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schatzi (n.)

"German girlfriend," 1956, from U.S. Army jargon, from German Schatzi, diminutive of Schatz, a term of endearment for a woman, literally "treasure," from Proto-Germanic *skatta- (source also of Dutch schat "treasure," Gothic skatts "piece of money, money"), originally "cattle," which is of uncertain origin.

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spending (n.)
late Old English, verbal noun from spend (v.). Spending-money is from 1590s.
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B.T.U. 

1889 as an abbreviation of British Thermal Unit (1862), a commercial unit of electrical energy (the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit); the French Thermal Unit is the amount of heat required to raise 1 kilogram of water 1 degree centigrade. Also from 1889 as an abbreviation of Board of Trade Unit, in electicity "1,000 watt hours."

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equalize (v.)
1580s, "make equal, cause to be equal in amount or degree," from equal (adj.) + -ize. Sports score sense attested by 1925. Related: Equalized; equalizing.
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underestimate (v.)
1812, "to estimate at too low an amount," from under + estimate (v.). Meaning "to rank too low, undervalue" is recorded from 1850. Related: Underestimated; underestimating.
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snowfall (n.)
1821, "fall of snow," especially a quiet one (as distinguished from a snowstorm), from snow (n.) + storm (n.). From 1875 as "amount that falls at a place in a given time."
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lolly (n.)
short for lollipop, 1854. Also, in mid-20c. British slang, "money."
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displacement (n.)

1610s, "removal from office;" see displace + -ment. As "quantity of a liquid displaced by a solid body put into it," 1809. Physics sense "amount by which anything is displaced" is from 1837.

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