Etymology
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underestimate (v.)
1812, "to estimate at too low an amount," from under + estimate (v.). Meaning "to rank too low, undervalue" is recorded from 1850. Related: Underestimated; underestimating.
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snowfall (n.)
1821, "fall of snow," especially a quiet one (as distinguished from a snowstorm), from snow (n.) + storm (n.). From 1875 as "amount that falls at a place in a given time."
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mosh (v.)
"to dance (with a certain amount of violence) to metal music in a tightly packed arena," 1987, perhaps a variant of mash. Related: Mosh pit.
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schatzi (n.)

"German girlfriend," 1956, from U.S. Army jargon, from German Schatzi, diminutive of Schatz, a term of endearment for a woman, literally "treasure," from Proto-Germanic *skatta- (source also of Dutch schat "treasure," Gothic skatts "piece of money, money"), originally "cattle," which is of uncertain origin.

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somewhat (adv.)
c. 1200, "in a certain amount, to a certain degree," from some + what. Replaced Old English sumdæl, sume dæle "somewhat, some portion," literally "some deal."
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rainfall (n.)

also rain-fall, by 1850 as "amount of precipitation that falls as rain, from rain (n.) + fall (n.). By 1858 as "a falling of rain."

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smidgen (n.)
1845, perhaps from Scottish smitch "very small amount; small insignificant person" (1822). Compare Northumbrian dialectal smiddum "small particle of lead ore" (1821).
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Paypal (n.)
e-commerce money transfer business, formed 2000 by merger of earlier firms.
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equalize (v.)
1580s, "make equal, cause to be equal in amount or degree," from equal (adj.) + -ize. Sports score sense attested by 1925. Related: Equalized; equalizing.
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lolly (n.)
short for lollipop, 1854. Also, in mid-20c. British slang, "money."
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