Etymology
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agriology (n.)
study of prehistoric human customs, 1878, from agrio-, from Greek agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field") + -logy. Related: Agriologist (n., 1875); agriological.
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proctology (n.)

"branch of medicine concerned with the anus or rectum," 1896, from Latinized form of Greek prōktos "anus" (from PIE *prokto-, source also of  Armenian erastan-k' "buttocks") + -logy "study of." Related: Proctologist (1897).

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pedology (n.)

"scientific study of the soil," 1924, from German pedologie (1862) or French pédologie (1899), ultimately from Greek pedon "ground, earth" (from suffixed form of PIE root *ped- "foot") + -logy. Related: Pedological. Earlier it was a word for "the study of children" (1894), from pedo-.

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teleology (n.)
"study of final causes," 1740, from Modern Latin teleologia, coined 1728 by German philosopher Baron Christian von Wolff (1679-1754) from Greek teleos "entire, perfect, complete," genitive of telos "end, goal, result" (see telos), + -logia (see -logy). Related: Teleologist; teleological.
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moerologist (n.)

also moirologist, "professional mourner," by 1868, from Greek moira "part, lot, fate" (see Moira) + -logia, from root of legein "to speak" (see -logy). Related: Moerology.

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herpetology (n.)
"study of reptiles," 1816, from French herpétologie (18c.), coined from Greek herpeton "reptile," literally "creeping thing," from herpein "to creep" (see serpent) + French -logie (see -logy). Related: Herpetologist; herpetological.
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osteology (n.)

"the branch of anatomy which treats of the bones," 1660s, from French ostèologie, from Modern Latin osteologia, from Greek osteon "bone" (from PIE root *ost- "bone") + -logia (see -logy). Related: Osteologist; osteological.

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neurology (n.)

"scientific study of the form and function of the nervous system," 1680s, from Modern Latin neurologia, from Modern Greek neurologia (1660s), from neuro- "nerves, the nervous system" (see neuro-) + -logia "study" (see -logy). Related: Neurological (1755).

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pharmacology (n.)

"the sum of scientific knowledge concerning drugs," 1721, formed in Modern Latin (1680s) from pharmaco- (see pharmacy) + -logy. It includes pharmacy (the art of preparing drugs) and also pharmacodynamics (what is known concerning their action). Related: Pharmacological.

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nomology (n.)

1825, "study of what relates to society" (obsolete); 1845, in philosophy, "science of the fundamental laws of thinking;" 1879, "science of law and legislation," from Greek nomos "usage, law, custom" (from PIE root *nem- "to assign, allot; to take") + -logy. Related: Nomologist; nomologistical.

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