Etymology
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cataleptic (adj.)

"pertaining to or affected with catalepsy," 1680s, from Late Latin catalepticus, from Greek kataleptikos, from kataleptos (see catalepsy). The noun meaning "one affected by catalepsy" is from 1851.

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catalog 

an alternative spelling of catalogue. There are examples from 16c., but in modern times it seems to have emerged late 19c. (Century Dictionary, 1895, describes it as "a recent spelling"), but it was used earlier in German.

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catalogue (n.)

"a list of separate items, an itemized enumeration," usually in order and with some description, early 15c., cathaloge, from Old French catalogue "list, index" (14c.), and directly from Late Latin catalogus, from Greek katalogos "a list, register, enrollment" (such as the katalogos neon, the "catalogue of ships" in the "Iliad"), from katalegein "to reckon up, tell at length," from kata "down; completely" (see cata-) + legein "to say, count," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."

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catalogue (v.)

1590s, "to make a catalogue;" see catalogue (n.). From 1630s as "to enter into a catalogue." Related: Catalogued; cataloguer; cataloguing.

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catalpa (n.)

type of large-leaved North American tree with winged seeds, c. 1740, from an American Indian language of the Carolinas, perhaps Creek (Muskogean) /katalpa/, literally "head-wing."

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catalyse (v.)

variant spelling of catalyze (q.v.); for spelling, see -ize. Related: Catalysed; catalysing.

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catalysis (n.)

1650s, "dissolution," from Latinized form of Greek katalysis "dissolution, a dissolving" (of governments, military units, etc.), from katalyein "to dissolve," from kata "down" (or "completely"), see cata-, + lyein "to loosen" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). The chemical sense of "change caused by an agent which itself remains unchanged" is attested from 1836, introduced by Swedish chemist Jöns Jakob Berzelius (1779-1848).

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catalyst (n.)

"substance which speeds a chemical reaction but itself remains unchanged," 1900, formed in English (on analogy of analyst) from catalysis. Figurative use by 1943.

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catalytic (adj.)

"having the power of decomposing a compound chemical body," 1836, from Latinized form of Greek katalytikos "able to dissolve," from katalyein "to dissolve," from kata "down" (or "completely"), see cata-, + lyein "to loosen" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").

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