Etymology
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Vulpecula 
constellation added to the celestial map in 1687 by Johannes Hevelius, from Latin vulpecula, volpecula "little fox," diminutive of vulpes, volpes "fox" (see vulpine).
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vulpine (adj.)
"pertaining to a fox, fox-like," 1620s, from Latin vulpinus "of or pertaining to a fox," from vulpes, earlier volpes (genitive vulpis, volpis) "fox," from PIE *wlpe- "fox" (source also of Greek alopex "fox").
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vulture (n.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French vultur, Old French voutoir, voutre (Modern French vautour), from Latin vultur, earlier voltur, perhaps related to vellere "to pluck, to tear" (see svelte). Figurative sense is recorded from 1580s. Related: Vulturine; vulturous.
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vulva (n.)
late 14c., from Latin vulva, earlier volva "womb, female sexual organ," perhaps literally "wrapper," from volvere "to turn, twist, roll, revolve," also "turn over in the mind," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve," with derivatives referring to curved, enclosing objects.
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VW (n.)
1958, short for Volkswagen, which is German for "people's car" (see folk (n.) + wagon).
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