Etymology
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voyage (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French voiage "travel, journey, movement, course, errand, mission, crusade" (12c., Modern French voyage), from Late Latin viaticum "a journey" (in classical Latin "provisions for a journey"), noun use of neuter of viaticus "of or for a journey," from via "road, journey, travel" (see via).
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voyage (v.)
late 15c., from Old French voyager, from voiage (see voyage (n.)). Related: Voyaged; voyaging.
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voyager (n.)
late 15c., from Old French voyagier, from voiage (see voyage (n.)).
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voyeur (n.)

a scopophiliac, 1889 as a French word in English, from French voyeur, literally "one who views or inspects," from voir "to view," from Latin videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see").

Je ne puis pourtant omettre une catégorie de sadistes assez étonnants; ce sont ceux qu'on désigne sous le nom de "voyeurs." Ceux-ci cherchent une excitation dans les spectacles impudiques. [Léo Taxil]
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voyeuristic (adj.)
1919, from voyeur + -istic. Related: Voyeuristically.
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vroom 
1967, echoic of the sound of a motor engine revving.
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vs 
abbreviation in law of Latin versus "turned toward or against," past participle of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Also sometimes vs.; ver.
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vue 
French, literally "view, sight; aspect, appearance; vision" (see view (n.)).
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vug (n.)
1818, from Cornish vooga "a cavity in rock; cave, hollow."
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