Etymology
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vor 
German, "before, in front of" (see fore).
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voracious (adj.)
1630s, formed as an adjectival form of voracity. Related: Voraciously; voraciousness.
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voracity (n.)

"greediness of appetite, voraciousness," 1520s, from French voracité (14c.) or directly from Latin voracitatem (nominative voracitas) "greediness, ravenousness," from vorax (genitive voracis) "greedy, ravenous, consuming," from vorare "to devour," from PIE *gwor-a-, from root *gwora- "food, devouring."

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vorlage (n.)
"skiing," 1939, from German vorlage, from vorlegen "to lean forward," from vor (see fore) + legen, from Old High German laga "act of laying," from Proto-Germanic *lagam, from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay."
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-vorous 
word-forming element meaning "eating," from Latin -vorous, from stem of vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").
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vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

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vortex (n.)
1650s, "whirlpool, eddying mass," from Latin vortex, variant of vertex "an eddy of water, wind, or flame; whirlpool; whirlwind," from stem of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Plural form is vortices. Became prominent in 17c. theories of astrophysics (by Descartes, etc.). In reference to human affairs, it is attested from 1761. Vorticism as a movement in British arts and literature is attested from 1914, coined by Ezra Pound. Related: Vortical; vorticist.
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votary (n.)
1540s, "one consecrated by a vow," from Latin votum "a promise to a god; that which is promised" (see vow (n.)) + -ary. Originally "a monk or nun," general sense of "ardent devotee of some aim or pursuit" is from 1591 (in Shakespeare, originally in reference to love). Related: Votaress.
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vote (v.)
1550s, "give a vote to;" 1560s, "enact or establish by vote,"; see vote (n.). Earlier it meant "to vow" to do something (mid-15c.). Related: Voted; voting.
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vote (n.)
mid-15c., "formal expression of one's wish or choice with regard to a proposal, candidate, etc.," from Latin votum "a vow, wish, promise to a god, solemn pledge, dedication," noun use of neuter of votus, past participle of vovere "to promise, dedicate" (see vow (n.)). Meaning "totality of voters of a certain class or type" is from 1888.
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