Etymology
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cosmos (n.)

c. 1200, "the universe, the world" (but not popular until 1848, when it was taken as the English equivalent to Humboldt's Kosmos in translations from German), from Latinized form of Greek kosmos "order, good order, orderly arrangement," a word with several main senses rooted in those notions: The verb kosmein meant generally "to dispose, prepare," but especially "to order and arrange (troops for battle), to set (an army) in array;" also "to establish (a government or regime);" "to deck, adorn, equip, dress" (especially of women). Thus kosmos had an important secondary sense of "ornaments of a woman's dress, decoration" (compare kosmokomes "dressing the hair," and cosmetic) as well as "the universe, the world."

Pythagoras is said to have been the first to apply this word to "the universe," perhaps originally meaning "the starry firmament," but it later was extended to the whole physical world, including the earth. For specific reference to "the world of people," the classical phrase was he oikoumene (ge) "the inhabited (earth)." Septuagint uses both kosmos and oikoumene. Kosmos also was used in Christian religious writing with a sense of "worldly life, this world (as opposed to the afterlife)," but the more frequent word for this was aiōn, literally "lifetime, age."

The word cosmos often suggested especially "the universe as an embodiment of order and harmony."

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Stuka (n.)
German dive bomber of World War II, 1940, from German shortening of Sturzkampfflugzeug, from Sturz "fall" + Kampf "battle" + Flugzeug "aircraft."
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mortified (adj.)

"deeply humiliated," 1717, past-participle adjective from mortify. Earlier it meant "dead to sin or the world" (early 15c.); "gangrenous" (late 14c.).

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demob (v.)

1919, short for demobilize. Originally in reference to troops returning to civilian life at the end of World War I. Related: Demobbed.

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stateside (adj.)
also state-side, 1944, World War II U.S. military slang, from the States "United States" (see state (n.2)) + side.
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briefing (n.)
"fact or situation of giving preliminary instructions," 1910 (but popularized by World War II pre-flight conferences), verbal noun from brief (v.).
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liaise (v.)
1928, back-formation from liaison. Said to have been a coinage of British military men in World War I. Related: Liaised; liaising.
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academia (n.)
"the academic community, the world of colleges and universities," 1956, Modern Latin, from Academe (q.v.). Related modern coinages include academize (1966); academese (1937).
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offensive (n.)

1720, the offensive, "condition of attacking, an aggressive action or course," from offensive (adj.). Military sense of "forceful action toward a particular end" is by 1918, from World War I.

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hypnopedia (n.)
also hypnopaedia, "sleep-learning," 1932, in "Brave New World," from hypno- "sleep" + ending derived from Greek paideia "education," from pais (genitive paidos) "child" (see pedo-).
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