Etymology
Advertisement
mask (n.)

1530s, "a cover for the face (with openings for the eyes and mouth), a false face," from French masque "covering to hide or guard the face" (16c.), from Italian maschera, from Medieval Latin masca "mask, specter, nightmare," a word of uncertain origin.

It is perhaps from Arabic maskharah "buffoon, mockery," from sakhira "be mocked, ridiculed." Or it may come via Provençal mascarar, Catalan mascarar, Old French mascurer "to black (the face)," which is perhaps from a Germanic source akin to English mesh (q.v.). But it may be a Provençal word originally: Compare Occitan mascara "to blacken, darken," derived from mask- "black," which is held to be from a pre-Indo-European language, and Old Occitan masco "witch," surviving in dialects; in Beziers it means "dark cloud before the rain comes." [See Walther von Wartburg, "Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch: Eine Darstellung galloromanischen sprachschatzes"].

Figurative meaning "anything used or practiced for disguise or concealment" is by 1570s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
puss (n.2)

"the face" (but sometimes, especially in pugilism slang, "the mouth"), especially when sour-looking or ugly, 1890, slang, from Irish pus "lip, mouth."

Related entries & more 
pash (n.)

"the head; the face; the brains," 1610s, now obsolete or dialectal, of uncertain origin. In 20c. a similar word was used as a colloquial shortening of passion.

Related entries & more 
orient (v.)

by 1741, "to arrange (something) so as to face east," from French s'orienter "to take one's bearings," literally "to face the east" (also the source of German orientierung), from Old French orient "east," from Latin orientum (see orient (n.)). Extended meaning "place or arrange in any definite position with reference to the points of the compass" is by 1842; the figurative sense, with reference to new situations or ideas, is by 1850. Related: Oriented; orienting.

Related entries & more 
knuckle-duster (n.)
face-busting, hand-protecting metal knuckle-guard, 1857, from knuckle (n.) + duster, name of a type of protective coat worn by workmen.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dogface (n.)

"soldier in the U.S. Army," especially an infantryman, by 1941, from dog (n.) + face (n.). Said to have been originally a contemptuous name given by the Marines.

Related entries & more 
dodecahedron (n.)

"solid having twelve faces," 1560s, from Greek dōdeka "twelve" (see dodeca-) + hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Related: Dodecahedral.

Related entries & more 
superficial (adj.)
late 14c., in anatomical and mathematical uses, "of or relating to a surface," from Late Latin superficialis "of or pertaining to the surface," from superficies "surface, upper side, top," from super "above, over" (see super-) + facies "form, face" (see face (n.)). Meaning "not deep, without thorough understanding, cursory, comprehending only what is apparent or obvious" (of perceptions, thoughts, etc.) first recorded early 15c. (implied in superficially "not thoroughly").
Related entries & more 
muffle (n.)

"thing that muffles," 1560s, from muffle (v.). Originally "a muffler" (in the old sense), "a wrap for the lower face and neck." Meaning "a cover or wrap used to deaden sound" is by 1734.

Related entries & more 
furrow (v.)
early 15c., "to plow, make furrows in," from furrow (n.). Meaning "to make wrinkles in one's face, brow, etc." is from 1590s. Old English had furian (v.). Related: Furrowed; furrowing.
Related entries & more 

Page 7