Etymology
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leukocyte (n.)
also leucocyte, "white blood cell, white or colorless corpuscle of the blood or lymph," 1860, via French leucocyte, from leuco-, a Latinized combining form of Greek leukos "white, clear," from PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness" + -cyte "cell."
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hemato- 
also haemato-, before vowels hemat-, haemat-, word-forming element in scientific compounds meaning "blood," from Greek haimato-, combining form of haima (genitive haimatos) "blood" (see -emia). Compare hemo-.
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fibrin (n.)
blood-clotting substance, 1800, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber) + chemical suffix -in (2). So called because it is deposited as a network of fibers that cause the blood to clot.
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embolism (n.)
late 14c., "intercalation, insertion of days into a calendar," from Old French embolisme "intercalation," from Late Latin embolismus "insertion of days in a calendar to correct errors," from Late Greek embolismos "intercalation," from embolos "peg, stopper; anything pointed so as to be easily thrust in," also "a tongue (of land), beak (of a ship)," from emballein "to insert, throw in, invade" from assimilated form of en "in" (see en- (2)) + ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach," with extended sense "to pierce"). Medical sense of "obstruction of a blood vessel" is first recorded in English 1855. Related: embolismic.
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sea-captain (n.)

"commander of an ocean-going vessel," 1610s; see sea + captain (n.).

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argosy (n.)
1570s, "large merchant vessel carrying rich freight," from Italian (nave) Ragusea "(vessel) of Ragusa," maritime city on the Dalmatian coast of the Adriatic (modern Dubrovnik in Croatia). Their large merchant ships brought rich Eastern goods to 16c. England. The city name sometimes was Aragouse or Arragosa in 16c. English. Figurative use from 1620s.
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urn (n.)
late 14c., "large, rounded vase used to preserve the ashes of the dead," from Latin urna "a jar, vessel of baked clay, water-jar; vessel for the ashes of the dead" (also used as a ballot box and for drawing lots), probably from earlier *urc-na, akin to urceus "pitcher, jug," and from the same source as Greek hyrke "earthen vessel." But another theory connects it to Latin urere "to burn" (compare bust (n.1)).
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hyperglycemia (n.)
1875, from hyper- "over" + glycemia "presence of sugar in the blood."
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consanguinity (n.)

"kinship by common descent," c. 1400, from Old French consanguinité and directly from Latin consanguinitatem (nominative consanguinitas), from consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

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bloodless (adj.)
Old English blodleas, "drained of blood;" see blood (n.) + -less. The figurative sense in Middle English was "powerless, without spirit or energy." Meaning "free from bloodshed" is from c. 1600; that of "cold-hearted" is from 1881. Related: Bloodlessly.
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