Etymology
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comprehensive (adj.)

"containing much in comparatively small limits," 1610s, from French comprehénsif, from Late Latin comprehensivus, from comprehens-, past participle stem of Latin comprehendere "to take together, to unite; include; to comprehend, perceive" (to seize or take in the mind), from com "with, together," here probably "completely" (see com-) + prehendere "to catch hold of, seize," from prae- "before" (see pre-) + -hendere, from PIE root *ghend- "to seize, take." Related: Comprehensively (mid-15c.); comprehensiveness.

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snarf (v.)
"to take, grab," by 1989. Related: Snarfed; snarfing.
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nosocomial (adj.)

"relating to a hospital," 1849 (earlier in German and French), from Late Latin nosocomium, from Greek nosokomeion "an infirmary," from nosokomein "to take care of the sick," from nosos "disease, sickness," a word of unknown origin, + komein "take care of, attend to." Nosocome was a 17c. word for "hospital."

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apheresis (n.)
also aphaeresis, "suppression of a letter or syllable at the beginning of a word," 1610s, from Latin aphaeresis, a grammarians' use of Greek aphairesis "a taking away," from aphairein "to take away," from assimilated form of apo "from, off" (see apo-) + hairein "to take" (see heresy). Related: Apheretic.
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pick up (v.)

early 14c. as a verbal phrase, "lift and take with the fingers," from pick (v.) + up (adv.). From 1510s as "take or get casually, obtain or procure as opportunity offers." Meaning "take (a person found or overtaken) into a vehicle or vessel," is from 1690s, also, of persons, "make acquaintance or take along" (especially for sexual purposes). Intransitive meaning "improve gradually, reacquire vigor or strength" is by 1741. Sense of "tidy up" is from 1861; that of "arrest" is from 1871; meaning "gain speed" is from 1922; meaning "to pay" (a check, tab, etc.) is from 1945. Pick-me-up "stimulating alcoholic drink" is attested from 1867.

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numb (adj.)

c. 1400, nome, "deprived of motion or feeling, powerless to feel or act," literally "taken, seized," from past participle of nimen "to take, seize," from Old English niman "to take, catch, grasp" (from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take"). The unetymological -b (to conform to comb, limb, etc.) appeared 17c. The notion is of being "taken" with palsy, shock, and especially cold. Figurative use is from 1560s.

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incipient (adj.)
"beginning, commencing," 1660s, from Latin incipientem (nominative incipiens), present participle of incipere "begin, take up; have a beginning, originate," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Incipiently.
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vengeful (adj.)
1580s, from obsolete venge (v.) "take revenge" + -ful. Related: Vengefully; vengefulness.
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assumptive (adj.)
early 15c., from Mwdieval Latin assumptivus, from assumpt-, past participle stem of assumere/adsumere "take up, take to oneself" (see assume) + -ive. Oldest sense in English is medical, of bloodletting, "withdrawing humours from opposite parts of the body."
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lunch (v.)

"to take a lunch," 1786, from lunch (n.). Related: Lunched; lunching.

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