Etymology
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somatic (adj.)

"pertaining to the body" (as distinct from the soul, spirit, or mind), 1775, from French somatique and directly from Latinized form of Greek sōmatikos "of the body," from sōma (genitive sōmatos) "the body" (see somato-).

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manful (adj.)

"having or expressing the spirit of a man; characterized by the higher qualities of manhood," late 14c., "courageous, brave, resolute," also (early 15c.) "magnanimous, noble," from man (n.) + -ful.

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possessed (adj.)

"controlled by an indwelling demon or evil spirit," 1530s, past-participle adjective from possess (v.). An Old English and Middle English phrase for it was devel seoc.

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Lilith 
female evil spirit, in medieval Hebrew folklore the first wife of Adam, from Hebrew Lilith, from Akkadian Lilitu, which is connected by folk etymology with Hebrew laylah "night."
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mercantilism (n.)

"a mercantile spirit or character; devotion (or excess devotion) to trade and commerce," 1834, from French mercantilisme; see mercantile + -ism. By 1881 as "the mercantile system." Related: Mercantilist; mercantilistic.

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obsession (n.)

1510s, "action of besieging" (a sense now obsolete), from French obsession and directly from Latin obsessionem (nominative obsessio) "siege, blockade, a blocking up," noun of action from past-participle stem of obsidere "to besiege" (see obsess). Later (c. 1600), "hostile action of an evil spirit" (like possession but without the spirit actually inhabiting the body). Transferred sense of "action of anything which engrosses the mind" is from 1670s. Psychological sense "idea or image that intrudes on the mind of a person against his will" is from 1901.

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geist (n.)

1871, "intellectuality," also, variously, after German, "spirit" of a place or time; "spirituality," from German Geist (see ghost (n.), and compare zeitgeist). A German word for "enthusiasm, rapture; inspiration" is begeisterung.

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numen (n.)

"divine spirit, presiding divinity," 1620s, from Latin numen "divine will, divinity," literally "a nod" (the notion is "divine approval expressed by nodding the head"), from nuere "to nod" (assent); see numinous.

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animate (adj.)
"alive," late 14c., from Latin animatus, past participle of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven," from anima "life, breath" (from PIE root *ane- "to breathe").
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aggrieved (adj.)
c. 1300, "annoyed, incensed, resentful, angry;" late 14c., "oppressed in spirit," past-participle adjective from aggrieve (v.). The legal sense of "injured or wronged in one's rights" is from 1580s.
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