Etymology
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outrage (n.)

c. 1300, "evil deed, offense, crime; affront, indignity, act not within established or reasonable limits," of food, drink, dress, speech, etc., from Old French outrage "harm, damage; insult; criminal behavior; presumption, insolence, overweening" (12c.), earlier oltrage (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *ultraticum "excess," from Latin ultra "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- "beyond").

Etymologically, "the passing beyond reasonable bounds" in any sense; meaning narrowed in English toward violent excesses because of folk etymology from out + rage. Of injuries to feelings, principles, etc., from 1769.

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flattery (n.)
early 14c., "dishonest praise, coaxing speech," from Old French flaterie "flattery, cajolery" (Modern French flatterie), from flater "to flatter" (see flatter).
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speechless (adj.)
Old English spæcleas "permanently mute;" see speech + -less. Meaning "mute by effect of astonishment" is from late 14c. Related: Speechlessly; speechlessness.
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volubility (n.)

1570s, from French volubilité (16c.) or directly from Latin volubilitatem (nominative volubilitas) "a rapid turning," figuratively "fluency (of speech)," from volubilis (see voluble).

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decolonization (n.)

1853 in a political sense, "remove (a place) from colonial status," American English, from de- + colonization. Earlier as a medical term (from colon (n.2)).

The great occupation of the nations of western Europe, from the beginning of the fifteenth century to near the close of the eighteenth century, was colonization and the establishment of empire on the American continent. The year 1775 witnessed the opening of the first act in the great drama of the decolonization of this continent, the end of which is not yet. [Speech of Hon. W.H. Seward of New York in the Senate, February 8, 1853, in Appendix to the Congressional Globe, 2nd Session, 32nd Congress]
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finical (adj.)
"fastidious, affecting extreme elegance in manners, taste, or speech," 1590s; see finicky. Related: finically; finicality; finick (v.), 1857.
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mock (n.)

early 15c., mokke, "derisive action or speech;" late 15c. (Caxton) "that which one derides or mocks;" from mock (v.).

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colonialism (n.)

1853, "ways or speech of colonial persons," from colonial + -ism. Meaning "the system of colonial rule" is from 1884; originally not necessarily pejorative and suggestive of exploitation.

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guarded (adj.)
1560, "protected, defended," past-participle adjective from guard (v.). Meaning "reserved and cautious in speech, behavior, etc." is from 1728. Related: Guardedly; guardedness.
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interact (v.)
"act on each other, act reciprocally," 1805, from inter- + act (v.). Related: Interacted; interacting.
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