Etymology
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bored (adj.)

"wearied, suffering from ennui," 1823, past-participle adjective from bore (v.2).

Society is now one polished horde,
Formed of two mighty tribes, the Bores and Bored.
[Byron, "Don Juan," 1823]

Meaning "pierced, perforated, cylindrically hollow" is 1510s, from bore (v.1).

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ownership (n.)

"state of being an owner; the right by which a thing belongs specifically to some person or body," 1580s, from owner + -ship. Ownership society, a concept combining the values of personal responsibility and economic freedom (2003) was popularized by U.S. president George W. Bush.

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toleration (n.)

1510s, "permission granted by authority, licence," from French tolération (15c.), from Latin tolerationem (nominative toleratio) "a bearing, supporting, enduring," noun of action from past-participle stem of tolerare "to endure, sustain, support, suffer," literally "to bear" (from PIE *tele- "to bear, carry;" see extol).

Meaning "forbearance, sufferance" is from 1580s. The specific religious sense is from 1609; as in Act of Toleration (1689), statute granting freedom of religious worship (with conditions) to dissenting Protestants in England. In this it means "recognition of the right of private judgment in matters of faith and worship; liberty granted by the government to preach and worship as one pleases; equality under the law without regard to religion."

If any man err from the right way, it is his own misfortune, no injury to thee; nor therefore art thou to punish him in the things of this life because thou supposest he will be miserable in that which is to come. Nobody, therefore, in fine, neither single persons nor churches, nay, nor even commonwealths, have any just title to invade the civil rights and worldly goods of each other upon pretence of religion. [John Locke, "Letter Concerning Toleration," 1689]
Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governour of the Universe: And if a member of Civil Society, do it with a saving of his allegiance to the Universal Sovereign. We maintain therefore that in matters of Religion, no man's right is abridged by the institution of Civil Society and that Religion is wholly exempt from its cognizance. [James Madison, "Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments," 1785]
Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. [Karl Popper, "The Open Society and Its Enemies," 1962]
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consortium (n.)

1829, "fellowship, association," from Latin consortium "fellowship, participation, society," from consors (genitive consortis; see consort (n.1)). Earlier, in British law, it was a term for "right of husband's access to his wife" and is attested from 1650s as a Latin word in English.

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debutante (n.)

1801, "female stage actress making her first public performance," from fem. of French debutant, noun use of present participle of débuter "to make the first strike" (in billiards, etc.), from debut (see debut). In reference to a young woman making her first appearance in society, from 1817.

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underworld (n.)

c. 1600, "the lower world, Hades, place of departed souls," also "the earth, the world below the skies," as distinguished from heaven. Similar formation in German unterwelt, Dutch onderwereld, Danish underverden. Meaning "lower level of society" is first recorded 1890; "criminals and organized crime collectively" is attested from 1900.

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Semitism (n.)

1848, "characteristic attributes of Semitic languages;" 1851, "characteristic attributes of Semitic people," especially "the ways, life, practices, etc., of Jewish people;" see Semite + -ism. By 1870 in the specialized sense of "Jewish influence in a society." However a Semitist (1885) was "one versed in Semitic languages."

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cooperative (adj.)

also co-operative, "operating or striving jointly for the attaining of certain ends," c. 1600, from Late Latin cooperat-, past participle stem of cooperari "to work together" (see cooperation) + -ive. Political economy sense is from 1808, from the pre-Marx communist movement. The noun meaning "a cooperative store" is from 1883; meaning "a cooperative society" is from 1921.

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accomplishment (n.)

early 15c., "performance of a task; state of completion," from Old French acomplissement "completion, action of accomplishing," from acomplir "to fulfill, carry out, complete" (see accomplish). Meaning "thing completed" and that of "something that completes" someone and fits him or her for cultivated or fashionable society are from c. 1600.

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socio- 

word-forming element meaning "social, of society; social and," also "having to do with sociology," from combining form of Latin socius "companion, ally, associate, fellow, sharer," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Common in compounds since c. 1880.

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