Etymology
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pixelation (n.)

also pixellation, graphics display effect in which individual pixels (small, square single-colored display elements that comprise the image) are visible, 1991, from pixel + -ation.

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old maid (n.)

"spinster, woman who remains single well beyond the usual marrying age," 1520s, from old + maid. The card game is attested by that name from 1831. 

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one-stop (adj.)

1914, of airplane flights, "making a single stop along the way," from one + stop (n.). Of commercial establishments, "able to supply all of a customer's needs," by 1931. 

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stroke (n.)

"act of striking," c. 1300, probably from Old English *strac "stroke," from Proto-Germanic *straik- (source also of Middle Low German strek, German streich, Gothic striks "stroke"); see stroke (v.).

The meaning "mark of a pen" is from 1560s; that of "a striking of a clock" is from mid-15c. Sense of "feat, achievement" (as in stroke of luck, 1853) first found 1670s; the meaning "single pull of an oar or single movement of machinery" is from 1731. Meaning "apoplectic seizure" is from 1590s (originally the Stroke of God's Hand). Swimming sense is from 1800.

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unit (n.)

1560s, "single number regarded as an undivided whole," alteration of unity on the basis of digit. Popularized in John Dee's English translation of Euclid, to express Greek monas (Dee says unity formerly was used in this sense). Meaning "single thing regarded as a member of a group" is attested from 1640s. Extended sense of "a quantity adopted as a standard of measure" is from 1738. Sense of "group of wards in a hospital" is attested from 1893.

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microcomputer (n.)

"small computer built around a single microprocessor," 1971, from micro- + computer. A name for what later generally would be called a personal or home computer.

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monometallic (adj.)

1876 in reference to currency, "consisting of but one metal; comprising coins that consist of either gold or silver, but not both," from mono- "single" + metallic. Opposed to bimetallic. In chemistry, from 1861.

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monoglot (adj.)

"speaking or using only one language," 1830, from Late Greek monoglōttos, from monos "single, alone" (see mono-) + glōtta "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)).

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stereoscope (n.)

1838, coined by inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) from stereo- + -scope. Instrument allowing binocular vision of two identical pictures that appear as a single image with relief and solidity. Related: Stereoscopy; stereoscopically.

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bowie knife (n.)

"heavy-single-edged sheath-knife used early 19c. on the U.S. frontier," 1827, named for its inventor, U.S. fighter and frontiersman Col. James "Jim" Bowie (1799-1836), and properly pronounced "boo-ee."

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