Etymology
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speechless (adj.)
Old English spæcleas "permanently mute;" see speech + -less. Meaning "mute by effect of astonishment" is from late 14c. Related: Speechlessly; speechlessness.
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one-sided (adj.)

1833, "dealing with one side only of a question or dispute," hence, "partial, unjust, unfair," from one + side (n.). Translating German ein-seitiger. Related: One-sidedly; one-sidedness.

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tremolo (n.)
"tremulous effect in music," 1801, from Italian tremolo, from Latin tremulus "trembling" (see tremulous).
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by-path (n.)
"side road," late 14c., from by + path.
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lopsided (adj.)
also lop-sided, "leaning to one side as a result of being disproportionately balanced," 1711 (lapsided), first used of ships; from lop (v.2) + side (n.). Related: Lopsidedly; lopsidedness.
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cisalpine (adj.)

"south of the Alps," 1540s, from Latin cisalpinus "on this side of the Alps" (from the Roman point of view), from cis- "on this side" (see cis-) + Alpinus "Alpine" (see Alpine). Compare ultramontane.

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telling (adj.)
"having effect or force," 1852, past-participle adjective from tell (v.).
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sidetrack (n.)
also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.
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counterproductive (adj.)

also counter-productive, "having the opposite of the desired effect," 1920, American English, from counter- + productive.

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