Etymology
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apostleship (n.)

"the office, dignity, or functions of an apostle," 1520s, from apostle + -ship. Old English had apostolhad (Middle English apostlehed).

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relationship (n.)

1640s, "sense or state of being related" by kindred, affinity, or other alliance, from relation + -ship. Specifically of romantic or sexual intimacy by 1944.

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ridership (n.)

mid-15c., "office of a mounted forest ranger," from rider + -ship. From 1962 as "number of passengers" (using a form of public transportation, etc.).

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lordship (n.)
c. 1300, from Old English hlafordscipe "authority, rule, dominion" (translating Latin dominatio); see lord (n.) + -ship. As a form of address to nobles, judges, etc., from late 15c.
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shipshape (adj.)

also ship-shape, "properly arranged, in thorough order," 1762, earlier ship-shapen (1640s), originally "according to the fashion of a (sailing) ship," where neatness is a priority and the rigging must be serviceable and stowed properly; see ship (n.) + shape (n.).

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discipleship (n.)

"state or condition of being a follower of another in doctrines and precepts," 1540s, from disciple + -ship. Old English had discipulhad, Middle English disciplehood.

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partnership (n.)

1570s, "state or condition of being a partner," from partner (n.) + -ship. In the commercial sense, "association of two or more persons for carrying on a business," from c. 1700.

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amidships (adv.)
"in or toward the middle of a ship," 1690s, from amid + ship (n.). It retains the genitive -s of compounds of amid in Middle English, suggesting this one is older than the written record of it.
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skiff (n.)
"small boat," 1570s, from French esquif (1540s), from Italian schifo "little boat," from a Germanic source (such as Old High German scif "boat;" see ship (n.)). Originally the small boat of a ship.
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generalship (n.)

1590s, "the functions of a general" (a sense now obsolete); 1620s, "the office of a general;" from general (n.) + -ship. The meaning "management of an army; the military skill or conduct of a commander" is by 1770.

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