Etymology
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intermit (v.)
1540s, "to interrupt" (obsolete); 1570s as "to discontinue for a time, suspend" (trans.) and "cease for a time" (intrans.), from Latin intermittere "to leave off, leave an interval, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting.
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remitter (n.)

mid-15c., a legal principle, "restoration of a prior or more valid title to certain property," from Old French remitter, noun use of infinitive, from Latin remittere "send back" (see remit). For legalese noun use of French infinitives, see waiver.

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delegate (n.)

late 15c., "person appointed and sent by another or others with power to transact business as a representative," from the past-participle adjective (early 15c.), from Old French delegat or directly from Latin delegatus, past participle of delegare "to send as a representative," from de- "from, away" (see de-) + legare "send with a commission," possibly literally "engage by contract" and related to lex (genitive legis) "contract, law," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather."

Sense of "person sent with representative powers to a convention, conference, etc." is from c. 1600. In U.S., "person elected or appointed to represent a territory in Congress," by 1825.

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relegation (n.)

"act of relegating, banishment," 1580s, from Latin relegationem (nominative relegatio) "a sending away, exiling, banishing," a specific term in ancient Roman law and later ecclesiastical law, noun of action from past-participle stem of relegare "remove, dismiss, banish, send away, schedule, put aside" (see relegate).

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reissue (v.)

also re-issue, 1610s, "go forth again" (intransitive), from re- "back, again" + issue (v.). Transitive sense of "send out or put forth a second time" (of banknotes, periodicals, etc.) is by 1799. Related: Reissued; reissuing. The noun, "a second or renewed issue," is attested from 1805.

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paresis (n.)

"partial or incomplete paralysis," as that affecting motion but not sensation, 1690s, Modern Latin, from Greek paresis "slackening of strength, paralysis," literally "a letting go," from stem of parienai "to let go," from para- (see para- (1)) + hienai "to send, throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel").

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ampere (n.)
1881, "the current that one volt can send through a resistance of one ohm," from French ampère, named for French physicist André-Marie Ampère (1775-1836). Adopted by the Electric Congress at Paris in 1881. Shortened form amp is attested from 1886.
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carbon-copy (n.)
1895, from carbon (paper) + copy (n.). A copy on paper made using carbon-paper (paper faced with carbon, used between two sheets for reproduction on the lower of what is drawn or written on the upper). The figurative sense is from 1944. Also as a verb, "send a carbon copy (of something)," and as such often abbreviated c.c.
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omit (v.)
Origin and meaning of omit

early 15c., omitten, "fail to use or do, fail or neglect to mention or speak of, to disregard," from Latin omittere "let go, let fall," figuratively "lay aside, disregard," from assimilated form of ob (here perhaps intensive) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Related: Omitted; omitting.

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mise en scene 

"the entire scenery and properties of a stage play," 1830, from French mise en scène, literally "setting on the stage," from mise (13c.) "a putting, placing," noun use of fem. past participle of mettre "to put, place," from Latin mittere "to send" (see mission). Hence, figuratively, "the surroundings of an event" (1872).

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