Etymology
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rattan 

also ratan, type of climbing palm with tough, flexible stems that are economically valuable for making chair-bottoms, walking sticks, baskets, etc., 1650s, from Malay (Austronesian) rotan, rautan, according to OED from raut "to trim, strip, peel, pare."

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rattle (v.)

c. 1300 (intransitive), "To make a quick sharp noise with frequent repetitions and collisions of bodies not very sonorous: when bodies are sonorous, it is called jingling" [Johnson]. Perhaps in Old English but not recorded; if not, from Middle Dutch ratelen, which is probably of imitative origin (compare German rasseln "to rattle," Greek kradao "I rattle").

The sense of "utter smartly and rapidly, speak with noisy and rapid utterance" is attested by late 14c. The meaning "to go along loosely and noisily" is from 1550s. The transitive sense is from late 14c. The colloquial American English figurative meaning of "fluster, shake up, unsettle" is attested by 1869, on the notion of "startle or stir up by noisy means." Related: Rattled; rattling.

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rationalize (v.)

1767, "explain in a rational way, make conformable to reason," from rational + -ize. The psychological sense of "to give an explanation that conceals true motives" dates from 1922, on the notion of "cause to appear reasonable or socially acceptable." In 19c. Newman and Browning also used it with an intransitive sense of "think for oneself, employ one's reason as the supreme test." Related: Rationalized; rationalizer; rationalizing.

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ratification (n.)

"act by which a competent authority gives sanction and validity to something done by another," mid-15c., ratificacion, from Old French ratification (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin ratificationem (nominative ratificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ratificare "to confirm, approve" (see ratify).

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rationality (n.)

1620s, "quality of having reason;" 1650s, "fact of being agreeable to reason," from French rationalité and directly from Late Latin rationalitas "reasonableness, rationality" (also source of Spanish racionalidad, Italian razionalita), from Latin rationalis "of or belonging to reason, reasonable" (see rational). Middle English had racionabilite "the faculty of reason" (early 15c.), from Latin rationabilitas.

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rattle (n.)

c. 1500, "rapid succession of short, sharp sounds," from rattle (v.). As a child's toy or other instrument contrived to make a rattling sound, from 1510s. As a sound made in the throat (especially of one near death) from 1752.

The watchman's rattle, formerly used for giving an alarm, and the child's toy resembling it, consist of a vibrating tongue slipping over the teeth of a rotating ratchet-wheel, and producing much noise when rapidly twirled by the handle. [Century Dictionary]
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rattletrap 

1766, originally a noun, a contemptuous term for a thing or things deemed trifling or of little value, from rattle (adj.) + trap, perhaps in the sense in traps (n.2). Hence, "a shabby, rattling object," especially a rickety coach or other vehicle (1822). The adjectival sense of "rickety" is recorded from 1834.

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first-rate (adj.)
"of the highest excellence," 1660s, from first (adj.) + rate (n.) in a specific sense "class of warships in the British Navy." As a mere emphatic statement expressing excellence, by 1812. Colloquially, as a quasi-adverb, 1844.
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ratafia (n.)

sweet liqueur flavored with kernels of cherries, apricots, etc., 1690s, from French ratafia (17c.), a word of unknown origin; perhaps ultimately from the same source as arrack.

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rate (v.1)

"to scold, chide vehemently, rebuke," late 14c., raten, probably from Old French rateir, variant of reter "to impute blame, accuse, find fault with," from Latin reputare "to count over, reflect," in Vulgar Latin, "to impute, blame," from re- "repeatedly" (see re-) + putare "to judge, suppose, believe, suspect" (originally "to clean, trim, prune," from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp"). Related: Rated; rating.

Old French reter also was borrowed into Middle English as retten "to blame" (c. 1300); also "to attribute, impute" (late 14c.), "to consider, think about" (late 14c.).

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