Etymology
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transparent (adj.)

early 15c., from Medieval Latin transparentem (nominative transparens), present participle of transparere "show light through," from Latin trans "across, beyond; through" (see trans-) + parere "come in sight, appear; submit, obey" (see appear). Figurative sense of "easily seen through" is first attested 1590s. The attempt to back-form a verb transpare (c. 1600) died with the 17c. Related: Transparently.

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recondite (adj.)

1640s, "removed or hidden from view," perhaps via obsolete French recondit, from Latin reconditus, past participle of recondere "store away, hide, conceal, put back again, put up again, lay up," from assimilated form of com- "together" (see com-) + -dere "put" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put, place").

The meaning "hidden from mental view, removed from ordinary understanding, profound" is from 1650s; of writers or writings, "little-known, obscure," from 1788. Related: Reconditeness.

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translucent (adj.)

1590s, from Latin translucentem (nominative translucens), present participle of translucere "to shine through," from trans "across, beyond; through" (see trans-) + lucere "to shine," from suffixed (iterative) form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness." Related: Translucently.

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stable (v.)

"to put in a certain place or position," c. 1300; "to put (a horse) in a stable," early 14c., from stable (n.) or from Old French establer. Related: Stabled; stabling.

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systole (n.)

"periodic contraction of the heart and arteries," 1570s, from Greek systole "a drawing together, contraction," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + stem related to stellein "to bring together, draw in; to put, set, place," from PIE *stel-yo-, suffixed form of root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place.

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code (v.)

"to put into code," 1815, from code (n.). Specifically "to put into computer code" from 1947. Intransitive sense "write computer code" is by 1987. Related: Coded; coding.

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vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

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perspicuous (adj.)

late 15c., "capable of being seen through" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin perspicuus "transparent, clear, evident," from perspicere "look through, look closely at" (see perspective). From 1580s as "clear to the understanding, not obscure or ambivalent." Related: Perspicuously; perspicuousness.

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slip (v.)

early 14c., slippen, "to escape, to move softly and quickly," from an unrecorded Old English word or cognate Middle Low German slippen "to glide, slide," from Proto-Germanic *slipan (source also of Old High German slifan, Middle Dutch slippen, German schleifen "to glide, slide"). This is probably from PIE *sleib-"slip, slide," from root *(s)lei- "slimy, sticky, slippery" (see slime (n.)). The verb is not found in Old English, which did have related adjective slipor "slippery, having a smooth surface." Related: Slipped; slipping

It is attested from mid-14c. in the sense of "lose one's footing, slide suddenly and unawares," also "slide out of place," also "fall into error or fault." The meaning "pass unguarded or untaken" is from mid-15c. That of "slide, glide, pass smoothly and easily" is from 1520s.

The transitive sense of "cause to move with a sliding motion" is from 1510s; the meaning "insert surreptitiously, put or place secretly" is from 1680s. The meaning "let loose, release from restraint" (1580s), is probably from the noun sense of "leash for a (hunting) dog that can be easily released" (1570s).

To slip on "put on (clothing, etc.) loosely or in haste" is from 1580s; to slip off "take off noiselessly or hastily" is from 1590s. To slip up "make a mistake, err inadvertently" is from 1855; to slip through the net "evade detection" is by 1829 (for slip through the cracks see crack (n.)). To let (something) slip originally (1520s) was a reference to hounds on a leash; figurative use for "allow to escape through carelessness" is by 1540s.

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input (v.)

late 14c., "put on, impose," from in (adv.) + put (v.). Modern sense "feed data into a machine" is from 1946, a new formation from the same elements.

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