Etymology
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cook (n.)

"one whose occupation is the preparing and cooking of food," Old English coc, from Vulgar Latin *cocus "cook," from Latin coquus, from coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest, turn over in the mind" from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

Germanic languages had no one native term for all types of cooking, and borrowed the Latin word (Old Saxon kok, Old High German choh, German Koch, Swedish kock).

There is the proverb, the more cooks the worse potage. [Gascoigne, 1575]
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lard (v.)
"prepare (meat) for roasting by inserting pieces of salt pork, etc., into it," mid-14c., from Old French larder "to lard, cook with strips of bacon fat" (12c.), from larde "bacon fat" (see lard (n.)). The inserted bacon strip is a lardon or lardoon (from French). Figuratively, of speech or writing, "intersperse with material by way of ornament or improvement," from 1540s. Related: Larded; larding.
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dishabille (n.)

"undress or negligent dress," especially "a loose morning dress," 1670s, from French déshabillé (17c.), noun use of past participle of déshabiller "to undress" (oneself), from des- (see dis-) + habiller "to dress," originally "prepare, arrange," from Latin habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, hold, possess; wear; find oneself, be situated; consider, think, reason, have in mind; manage, keep," from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive."

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preparation (n.)

late 14c., preparacioun, "act of preparing or making ready, preliminary act or operation, a previous setting in order," from Old French preparacion (13c.) and directly from Latin praeparationem (nominative praeparatio) "a making ready," noun of action from past participle stem of praeparare "prepare," from prae "before" (see pre-) + parare "make ready" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Meaning "a substance especially prepared or manufactured" is from 1640s.

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pave (v.)

early 14c., paven, "to cover (a street) with blocks of stone, tiles, or similar hard material set regularly and firmly in place," from Old French paver "to pave" (12c.), perhaps a back-formation from Old French pavement or else from Vulgar Latin *pavare, from Latin pavire "to beat, ram, tread down," from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp." Related: Paved; paving. The figurative sense of "make smooth or easy" (in pave the way "prepare the way for something to come") is attested from 1580s.

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repair (v.1)

"to mend, put back in order, restore to a sound, good, or complete condition," mid-14c., reparen, from Old French reparer "repair, mend" (12c.) and directly from Latin reparare "restore, put back in order," from re- "again" (see re-) + parare "make ready, prepare" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

The sense of "make amends for injury by an equivalent, make good" is by 1560s. Related: Repaired; repairing.

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adorn (v.)
late 14c., aournen, later adornen, "to decorate, embellish," also "be an ornament to," from Old French aorner "to order, arrange, dispose, equip; adorn," from Latin adornare "equip, provide, furnish;" also "decorate, embellish," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ornare "prepare, furnish, adorn, fit out," from stem of ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). The -d- was reinserted by French scribes 14c. and in English from late 15c. Related: Adorned; adorning.
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separate (v.)

early 15c., separaten, transitive, "remove, detach completely; divide (something), sever the connection or association of," from Latin separatus, past participle of separare "to pull apart," from se- "apart" (see secret (n.)) + parare "make ready, prepare" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Sever (q.v.) is a doublet, via French. Intransitive sense of "to part, be or become disunited or disconnected" is by 1630s of things, 1680s of persons. Related: Separated; separating.

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fettle (n.)
"condition, state, trim," c. 1750, in a glossary of Lancashire dialect, from northern Middle English fettle (v.) "to make ready, fix, prepare, arrange" (late 14c.), which is of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to Old English fetian "to fetch" (see fetch (v.)); perhaps from Old English fetel "a girdle, belt," from Proto-Germanic *fatilaz (source also of German fessel "fetter, chain," Old Norse fetill "strap, brace"), from PIE *ped- (2) "container" (see vat). Related: Fettler; fettling.
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set forth (v.)

verbal phrase, mid-13c. (intrans.), "express openly, present to view or consideration, make fully known;" c. 1400 as "leave, begin a journey" (set out in the same sense is from late 14c.); see set (v.) + forth (adv.). The notion of set involved in it is "proceed in a specified direction," hence begin to move" (attested from late Old English). From late 14c. as "prepare and send out, issue" (a commandment, etc.). Of a price from 1520s. Intransitive sense of "go, advance, begin to march" is from mid-14c.

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