Etymology
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mosaic (n.)

c. 1400, "process of making patterns of inlaid work in hard materials," from Old French mosaicq "mosaic work," from Italian mosaico, from Medieval Latin musaicum "mosaic work, work of the Muses," noun use of neuter of musaicus "of the Muses," from Latin Musa (see Muse). Medieval mosaics often were dedicated to the Muses.

The word was formed in Medieval Latin as though from Greek, but the (late) Greek word for "mosaic work" was mouseion (and Klein says this sense in Greek was borrowed from Latin). Meaning "a piece of mosaic work" is from 1690s. Figurative meaning "anything resembling a mosaic work in composition" is by 1640s. As an adjective in English, "made of small pieces inlaid to form a pattern," from 1580s. Related: Mosaicist.

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millwork (n.)

also mill-work, "machinery used in mills or manufacturies," 1770, from mill (n.1) + work (n.).

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rework (v.)

"to work (something) again or anew," 1842, from re- "again" + work (v.). Related: Reworked; reworking.

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meshwork (n.)

also mesh-work, "a network, a web, a plexus," 1830, from mesh (n.) + work (n.). Compare network.

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operand (n.)

in mathematics, "a quantity or symbol to be operated on," 1886, from Latin operandum, neuter gerundive of operari "to work, labor" (in Late Latin "to have effect, be active, cause"), from opera "work, effort," related to opus (genitive operis) "a work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance").

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coast guard (n.)

also coast-guard, 1827, a guard stationed on a coast, originally to prevent smuggling, later serving as a general police force for the coast; see coast (n.) + guard (n.).

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teamwork (n.)

also team-work, 1828 in the literal sense, "work done by a team of horses, oxen, etc." (as distinguished from manual labor), from team (n.) + work (n.). Attested by 1909 in the extended sense.

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lucubrate (v.)

1620s, "to work at night," from Latin lucubratus, past participle of lucubrare "work at night, work by lamplight," from the stem of lucere "to shine" (from PIE *louk-eyo-, suffixed (iterative) form of root *leuk- "light, brightness"). Hence "to write or study laboriously" (1804).

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bobby (n.)

"London policeman," 1844, from the familiar diminutive form of the masc. proper name Robert, in reference to Mr. (later Sir) Robert Peel (1788-1850), Home Secretary who introduced the Metropolitan Police Act (10 Geo IV, c.44) of 1829. Compare peeler.

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masterpiece (n.)

"a work or performance of a master, a piece of work of surpassing excellence," c. 1600, from master (n.) + piece (n.1). A loan-translation of Dutch meesterstuk "work by which a craftsman attains the rank of master" (or its German cognate Meisterstück).

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